Yellow Band: By Sea, Weeks 3 & 4

All hands on deck!

The constellation team rotating the nightbox onto its side so that we can attach the top.

We’ve got a few fantastic field trips under our belts, and we’re starting to get our sea legs. Last Friday evening, the Yellow Band took an after hours field trip up to Chabot Space and Science Center in Oakland for their weekly stargazing. Every Friday and Saturday night, weather permitting, the museum opens up their telescopes for folks to come take a look for free. AND, apparently they also host a telescope making workshop on Friday nights! So, not only did we get to look through their historic telescopes, we got to hangout with some super nice people who are working on making telescopes of their own!

On the right is Katie. She’s been working on grinding her mirror for 15 weeks, and she thinks she has 15 more weeks to go–wow, talk about perseverance!!!

Last week, she was using 220 grit to smooth out the surface of her mirror. As her mirror gets smoother and smoother, she’ll use finer and finer grit.

She even let us try our hands at grinding the mirror. Thank you so much Katie!

Now, all of this was because of building the constellation, which itself is because of studying a bit about celestial navigation. So, last week and this week we worked both on writing numbers like Babylonians and using a simple sextant, called a mariner’s quadrant to both locate our latitude and determine height of a few very tall things around our bandspace.

Working in other bases (besides base 10 that is) really forces you to think about how our number system works. During our work in base 60, Emilio taught us all a great trick: when working in base 10, a ‘silent alarm’ goes off in your head when you get to 10 that tells you to write a zero in the ones place, and add one to the number in the tens place. So, when doing math like Babylonians, we started sounding the alarm at 60!

Of course, the purpose of all of this was to ground our understanding of degrees. So, then we started to do some application, making mariner’s quadrants and beginning to tinker with the readings the quadrants gave us at different distances from an object.

So, when the sun came out on Thursday we were able to go outside and approximate our latitude! *It was almost noon, just a few days after the equinox, and also we were using very rudimentary sextants, so our measurements were in the ballpark.

Meanwhile, the Red Band has been trying to make little submarines–aka crafts with neutral buoyancy, that won’t sink or float, but rather hangout just under the surface. So, on Tuesday we went to the USS Pampanito! And the Aquarium of the Bay after of course! Our day was full of:

Awesome doorways.

Lots of tiny beds.
*Ask Sylvester about the Captain’s Quarters.

Torpedo/tables.

Smashed pennies.

Rough things to touch.

Slimy things to touch.

BIG FISH.

And SOSO much…

to look at!

Have a great break everybody!