Feedback from Fresh Eyes

The By Sea Arc has got us working double time on our expression projects. Each week a new iteration is due, and we’ve been taking time on Fridays to get feedback from the Brightworks community. This week students shared their second iterations with the band, and got feedback from someone in our community that was less familiar with their project. To encourage constructive feedback, we used the prompts: I like… I wish… What if… These prompts have come in handy for us before as a way to get feedback on works in progress, and it helps students to see their work from someone else’s perspective.

 

Oscar has been working on an underwater evolution simulation, and now has the simulator working autonomously. He gave a demo to the group to show how the creatures grow, and got some feedback to add more branches to the creatures.

 

Audrey has been collecting samples of ocean water, bay water, tap water, and distilled water to analyze what type of microbes might be living in it. She hopes to use that analysis to determine how that might help us understand the potential for life in the water on Mars. She’s planning to continue conducting experiments, and will consider ways to display her samples together so that they can be compared side by side.

 

Rhone’s second iteration is building off of the 24-hour boat kit he designed for his first iteration. Now he’s trying to figure out how one might survive for up to a week with just those items. So far, Rhone has designed a DIY water still out of the water bottles in the boat kit. His still removes the salt from seawater by collecting evaporated fresh water in the top bottle. Unfortunately, the process is VERY slow, and won’t make enough water in time for anyone to survive off of it for a week. Rhone got some feedback to think about harnessing heat to speed up the process, and to start thinking about solutions for sourcing food.

 

Norabelle has been working on seascape paintings, learning new painting techniques, and experimenting with various media. Seeing all the works side by side, the group was able to see the different styles she’s been inspired by. For her final iteration, she’s considering some feedback from the group to work bigger.

 

Declan has been charting out the plans to sail the boats we worked on earlier in the arc. He’s had some roadblocks around where, when, and how we can sail these boats. In spite of those roadblocks, he’s come up with a plan for how we might sail to Angel Island. He got some feedback to add specifics to the chart about when we’ll be sailing the boats, and how long we’ll be out on the water.

 

Felix has been working on an underwater music video. He got to share the unedited footage with the group on Friday. The group was mystified and delighted by the world he’s created for this underwater shoot. Since neither Rhone nor Felix can hold their breath underwater for the full five minute music video, his next steps will be to stitch the shots together and edit in the audio.

 

Khalia is working on a scale model of one of the rooms at the Angel Island Immigration Station. Khalia got feedback to share the scale ratio somewhere in her display so that people looking at the diorama could get a sense for the size of the actual room.

 

Earlier this week Elijah got some feedback that he would need to build more riggings to support the mast. After talking with a few experts though, he realized that the mast was actually quite strong with the foot in place. He demonstrated the strength of the mast by getting the boat on its side just by pulling on the mast.

 

Ella missed our feedback session on Friday, but she did get a chance to get some great advice on her podcast project from none other than Sarah Koenig! This photo was captured from behind the glass door of the music room where Ella was using some audio equipment to record the feedback from Sarah. Ella learned she’ll need to orient people right away to the story behind her podcast, to make it personal and intriguing.

 

Of course, each student will get to choose which feedback they want to incorporate, if they want to incorporate it, and how they want to do it. Students are using the guiding questions they came up with to stay focused on what they had originally set out to explore in their project. They’ll have one week to incorporate feedback, and come up with their final iteration. The arc is flying by, and it’s so exciting to see these expression projects take shape!

Expressing Themselves By Sea

Already three weeks into the Expression Phase, the Teal Band is full steam ahead on their projects. We’ve experienced chemical reactions, learned research techniques, discovered how helpful handwritten notecards are on a day when the internet is down, crafted, experimented and done a lot of writing.

Piper: So far I have made things–sea themed stuffed animals and soaps with little turtles in them– to sell to raise money for sea turtles. And handed out flyers so people know about it.  I have worked on making a book that’s going to talk about sea turtles and what they do. I hope that everyone will come to my craft fair at Umpqua Bank (24th St – Noe Valley) this Saturday. The banker is buying enough ice cream for 200 people, and says he’ll run out and get more if we need it!

Piper’s stuffie sea creatures for her sea turtle rescue fundraiser.

Nora: This morning, I was going over my paper and was disappointed to find it was way too short and I did not have enough information on the fish that lives in sargassum (if you want to learn about that you can read my research paper on expo night,) So, Melissa found some information on it which I looked over and we figured out the Sargassum fish is related to the angler fish (which i am kind of obsessed with I did a blog post, a model and a Prezi on earlier in the year) so I was very excited about that turns out I really like that kind of fish.

Nora’s sargassum seaweed models in clay and felt.

Huxley: I have done the chemistry and figured out that my super-corroding alloy has (in terms of the hydrogen it can produce) an energy density 13 times than that of a non-rechargeable lithium-ion battery! I have also created a design to implode hydrogen safely.

Huxley’s hydrogen measuring system. He’s gone through loads of vinegar.

Selina: My algae seem to be growing according to my expectations. I had a jar of plain seawater that I put a little fertilizer in. I checked on it today and it there was algae growing. This proves that if we were to dump iron ore into the ocean, as I am theorizing, algae would grow.

Setting up Selina’s algae experiment.

Jonah: I have been working on connecting my smaller gear to my big gear. The gearing is so that I can make it so that when the big gear that is connected to the water wheel spins enough to make the smaller wheel that is connected to the generator. I am going to work on the second iteration of the water wheel today.

Jonah’s first iteration hydropower plan.

Aurora: Moving forward in my project, I’m learning about the challenges of building shipping container homes. I would also like to learn about the different shapes of shipping container homes. Lastly, I would like to learn about how different architects are getting around the challenges of using shipping containers as homes.

Aurora has begun laying out her shipping container home.

Jared: I have done a lot of research and I have started to receiving emails from my experts. So far, besides doing research, I have begun working on my mini-documentary using iMovie.  Melissa has helped me organize my notes and helped me a lot.

Jared has been doing a lot of research on dolphin communication.

Patrick:  These last weeks before expo are always the hardest because you always like “Oh, this project is horrible compared to everyone’s projects.” I think I did well, for something that I’m not good at focusing on. I still need to do 1/3 of my project in a week. So, this should be fun.

Patrick is up to 13 followers following his fiction on RoyalRoadL.

Freddie: I feel and little stressed but I am finishing up my research paper. I am going to have a talk with Willow to start to help me with my drawings as I have already sketched them out. I’m ready to be done but my research paper needs a little more work and I feel like I am having writer’s block right now but hopefully I get it done in time.

Freddie is researching, writing and drawing about buoy and acorn barnacles.

As a little break from all their project work, the Teal Band enjoyed a lesson on dyeing natural fibers (silk) using natural dyes. They boiled cabbage and fig leaves to create their dyes. Exploring a bit of chemistry and pH, they played with their colors by dipping their dyed silks in different acids and bases.

Learning to dye silk with natural dyes from cabbage and fig leaves…with a bit of math and chemistry added in. Thanks Sierra.

Writing away and posing for pics with Mr. Manatee for the yearbook.

By Sea Declarations

All of the proposed Amber Band project declarations have been approved! Throughout the exploration phase of the By Sea Arc, we took a closer look at our relationship to the sea. We researched the ways each of us arrived in the Bay Area, and toured the Angel Island Immigration Station; collected and analyzed our personal water usage data; adopted drains in our neighborhood, and designed devices to help keep those drains clean; got up close to sharks at the Aquarium of the Bay, and heard an elephant seal serenade at the Marine Mammal Center. We kayaked in the bay, surfed in the ocean, slept on a submarine, and built boats. Now in the third week of the expression phase, students are building on what they learned in the exploration phase through their own expression project. Last week students shared declarations with Gever and Liz for final approval, and here’s what was proposed:

Ella and Norabelle visited Galería de la Raza to see how artists think about water, and how they present water related issues.

Ella

On the afternoon of May 7, 1915, the British ocean liner Lusitania was torpedoed by a German submarine off the south coast of Ireland. Within 20 minutes, the vessel sank into the Celtic Sea. Of 1,959 passengers and crew, 1,198 people were drowned, including 128 Americans. My great great great great grandfather was one of the survivors and after that he went totally crazy. 

For my project I want to do a podcast about how surviving the shipwreck effected him and his family.

In the final week of boat building, Amberites still managed to get their declarations approved. Felix gives a thumbs up after meeting with Gever about his underwater music video.

Felix

My desired product is a surreal cinematic music video that is all shot underwater. I’m using Rhone as the character in the video. Since Rhone and I are both humans, I will create a chart that times how long we will need to be under to shoot a shot.

This project will be a challenge for me because I will have to figure out how to bring things that shouldn’t be underwater, underwater. I will have to figure out how to keep us from floating or drowning. This project will be worth my time because I have had this idea for a music video all being shot underwater in my head for a year, and I’ve finally found the right opportunity to film it.

Khalia and the rest of Ambigo at the Angel Island Immigration Station.

Khalia

My project will tell Chinese immigrants’ stories. I find immigration interesting because it’s cool to see how different people got here. I want my project to make people feel lucky that they didn’t have to go through immigration. At Angel Island people had to sleep in a place where the people were cramped. It’s not something I would want to go through.

On a trip to Rodeo Beach, Oscar decided to transform into a merperson. Perhaps this was the moment he felt inspired to create his own evolution simulator for his expression project?

Oscar

I will make an evolution simulator that creates a description of  underwater plants/animals and their evolutions based on Darwin’s theory of Natural Selection, and an ecosystem based on the plants/animals that the simulator created.

This project will be a challenge to me because I want to better understand programming and evolution. I will be able to make an evolution simulation using my programming knowledge, and it will teach me more about evolution.

Norabelle out on the ferry photographing landscapes from the middle of the San Francisco Bay.

Norabelle

My desired  finish project is three finished waterscapes of Angel Island using different techniques. This project is challenging because I’ve never tried to do detailed landscapes before and I’ve never painted with extreme detail like I would like to for the painting part of my project

Elijah uses a sander to get the edges of the boat smooth enough to seal.

Elijah

I’m iterating on the boats we built as a band to make them more practical and comfortable. This project is worth my time because It is a great opportunity to learn more about how boats work and how boats are made. This is a challenge for me because I’m building the most out of the 4 of us who are using the boats for expression projects, and I have the least experience building. Also I’m not a big fan of sailing, so this will be good for getting me out of my comfort zone.

Declan, Oscar, and Felix work together to seal the sides of the boat.

Declan

I will use the boats we built to navigate around the Bay Area. I will use a professional chart of the Bay Area to plot our course around San Francisco. I will plan when we will launch, taking into account witch way the wind is blowing, what the tide is doing, and all of the rest of complications that I discover along the way. I will also teach the rest of my team how to sail.

The project I am hopeful to embark on is extremely important to the group’s mission because if the launch time and course are incorrectly judged the results could be catastrophic. We could end up way off course, be hit by a huge container ship, and even drown, to say the worst. However these fates could be avoided if you have someone to make sure everything goes smoothly.  

Audrey is all smiles after getting her declaration approved!

Audrey

Have you ever looked at something in nature and wondered: What is this made of? Me too. So for my project I want to identify chemical makeup of various specimens like water from the bay and analyze their chemical makeup. At the end of the project we will have an easy to understand display to show what I found in the water samples and why it’s there and whether it’s helpful or harmful to the ocean.

This project will be a challenge for me because I’ve never worked in a lab before or dealt with all that much chemistry at all. I want to do this project because I don’t know that much about chemistry and I’m hoping this experience will teach me. It will also further teach me about how to design an experiment and give me more hands on experience with science.

Rhone and Evan are problem solving some of the challenges of sealing the boat.

Rhone

For my project I will be going on a 24 hour sail trip with Declan, Audrey and Elijah. I will be focusing on life support, or as I like to call it “soccer mom”. I will design a boat survival pack that can last one person 30 days on a boat.

I will have to decide what’s necessary to have and what not necessary. (I tend to say just get it all) the boats are a big part of my project and if they don’t move or float or if there is any other problem that will prevent us from going in them we will have to figure it out.

Launching into Expression

The last few weeks have been busy. We’ve explored the stories of the Chinese immigrants in Chinatown, researched sea creatures, made paper mache models, prepared declarations, and even made lunch for the entire school. Now it’s time to fully launch into projects. This time around we have a wonderful collection of projects that truly speak to each Teal Bander and their interests. Below is their proposed project introduction from their declarations.

SelinaI am proposing to do a series of experiments on algae:

  • It turns out that the limiting factor of algae growth is the amount of iron in the water. In combination with researching how much oxygen algae produces per square inch and calculate the amount of algae that would need to be grown to counter the carbon footprint produced by the average family, I would like to try increasing the amount of iron in the water to figure out how much iron would need to be dumped into the ocean to counter the family’s carbon footprint production. This could be used in huge quantities to stop, or at least slow down, global warming.
  • Growing algae in different solutions such as different salinities and pHs to observe possible variation in growth rate.
  • Growing algae in polluted environments to observe what effect global warming/pollution will have on algae growth in the future.
  • Try growing Euglena gracilis, a type of algae, under a heat lamp. Euglena gracilis is a type of algae that, when grown in temperature from 31 to 35 c, loses it’s color and turns white.

Along with my experiments, I want to write a small research paper on sea anemones, specifically the giant green anemone, and their symbiotic relationship with algae.

PiperFor my project, I am proposing to learn about the ways people and organizations help to save sea turtles. I will write a research paper on sea turtles and the reasons they need saving and the ways people work to save them. I will also find an organization to support. I will make sea creature stuffed animals to sell and raise money for the organization. I will include a little “bio” about each type of sea creature with them.

PatrickI want to write an online fiction on the hosting site RoyalRoadL.

I found it a while back in January and have been hooked on it ever since with about 24 open fictions that I am keeping up on. I’ve wanted to write one of my own for about two weeks now and believe my project time will be well spent doing something I’m passionate about. My fiction will connect with the By Sea Arc because I will be incorporating research around hydraulics, fire pistons, and sailing cultures such as the Vikings.  I won’t really need anything for this project, just time, wi-fi, a computer and my imagination. Overall, I think this would teach me to be prepared for deadlines and how to focus better on what I’m supposed to be doing.

NoraFor my project, I will be trying to figure out why sargassum is suddenly coming to the shore in mounds and mounds making it impossible to swim.  I will also write a paper on sargassum, along with making a detailed model that would explain all of the different parts (e.g. the purpose of the grape-like balls filled with air so they will float on the surface of the water.)

Jonah: For my project, I am proposing to build a mini hydropower plant. This hydropower plant will use water to power a light bulb. Water will travel through a canal and over a waterwheel to create the power. As this is my first project, I want to take on something that won’t be too difficult, but is still fun, so I can take my time learning about the project phase. Huxley is helping me with the understanding of the energy flow. I think the hardest part about my project will be getting power from the generator to light the light bulb. I will also be researching hydropower, such as the positives and negatives of its use and creation.

JaredMy proposed project is on dolphin communication and echolocation. Dolphins are seen as highly intelligent and appear to have a language of their own that consists of whistles and clicks. I am interested in researching more about how they communicate with one another and their communication process in general, both through sounds and body language. Along with communicating, they use their clicks to help them echolocate. I will be writing a research paper and creating a short documentary on dolphin communication and echolocation.

HuxleyInstantly inflatable devices for drowning prevention have been released out into the market, however, their compressed CO2 system does not allow them to be larger scale than a personal device such as a bracelet that inflates to the size of a small balloon. Super-corroding alloys are made by combining a noble metal and a highly corrosive metal. When in contact with water, the noble metal forces the corrosive metal to corrode at an extremely accelerated rate, forming corrosive metal hydroxide or oxide, and a gigantic amount of H2. I want to create a instantly inflatable flotation device using supercoroding alloys, as proof of concept that this process would be able to produce a larger scale flotation device.

FreddieI, Fredrica Lipsett would like to propose my By Sea arc project where I study the natural history and evolution of barnacles. I would like to:

  • write a research paper,
  • make a major evolutionary family tree poster
  • do a dissection of both barnacle species  
  • anatomical drawings and draw diagrams of barnacles.

As there are over 1,400 different species of barnacles, I have decided to do my research on two specific barnacles. The first is the Acorn Barnacle which is the most common and the second is the Buoy Barnacles.

AuroraFor my project I am interested in researching the transportation of goods by sea. This project would include a number of parts:

  • Tracking an object from where it was made to Brightworks.
  • Interviewing experts in manufacturing and shipping to understand the manufacturing and delivery process.
  • Research how goods are packaged, how efficient it is to ship them from point A to point B by cargo ship, as well as how truck and train transportation affects the cost, monetarily and environmentally.
  • Make a model of a shipping container that, in an emergency, will float so that there will not be so many shipping containers at the bottom of the ocean where they scrape the hulls of boats and hurt the ecosystems.

These next seven weeks will be another wonderful adventure through the Expression Phase.

The beginning of our journey down the Barbary Coast Trail, The Granite Lady, the Old Mint.

Recording our reflections on our visit to Angel Island and Chinatown.

Our collection of paper mache sea creatures we researched.

Making breakfast for lunch for Community Lunch. Delicious!

Surfspiration

It’s Declaration Week at Brightworks, and while students started brainstorming ideas for their expression projects, we sought out inspiration on surfboards!

Ambigo after an epic day of surfing!

Fortunately for us, Brightworks is just a 20 minute drive to Linda Mar Beach, a perfect spot for any newbie surfer to feel the power of the waves. Most of the group had never been swimming in the Pacific Ocean before, and for many this was their first time surfing. We worked with experienced surfers to learn the basics: protect your head, keep your eyes on the waves, and fall flat.

We lucked out with some pretty perfect conditions, and everyone was able to catch a wave or two. Most of us boogied in, and a few even managed to pop up on their boards.

Everyone found a way to move with the water—on surf boards, boogie boards, and simply body surfing.

Khalia was ready to catch some waves after a one-on-one lesson with Sean.

Owen and Rhone are all smiles after spending the day on the water.

Elijah rolling in with the waves.

Anthony and Amparo grilling up tasty treats.

After a long day of surfing it was great to grill out!

How did we move with the water, and why? Back at school the group took some time to reflect on the time we spent surfing. Many realized how important it was to work with the water, rather than to fight against it. We also discussed the salinity of our blood, and compared that to the salinity of the ocean. We noticed how easy it was to float in our wetsuits, and some talked about regulating their buoyancy with their breath (like the submarines we designed a few weeks ago). The trip was a great way for us to reconnect with the sea before submitting declarations for approval, and diving into our expression projects!

BWXRed by-sea

Welcome to the by-sea arc explorations of the Red Band. We started our journey traversing the seas by submarine. The kids and I took on the task of creating bottle submarines that would dive and surface. Our initial problem was to sink a plastic bottle using coins, straws, binder clips, balloons, and tape which the kids tested in our sink or float tub.

Quinn and Abir worked together to sink their bottle by filling it with coins, paper, and water.

Applying what we learned from these tests, the kids set forth to sink their bottles which proved harder than we thought. Once the kids reflected on their work they found attaching heavy items to the bottles was not enough to counter the buoyancy of the bottle, rather filling the bottles with water was the most successful route. Employing what we learned about submarines and their ability to dive and surface, we set to work with our same materials to create our own ballast tanks. The final solution was to attach straws and cut out hole to encourage the bottle to fill and release water! Success!

Khalilah cuts out two holes in her submarine

To celebrate our  hard work Red and Yellow traveled across town to visit the U.S.S. Pampanito at Pier 45.

Onboard the U.S.S. Pampanito

During our journal reflection the kids shared that being on the water was not their favorite experience so we have set sail on our own virtual boat trip. Two weeks ago we packed up our stuffies, clothes, money, toothbrushes, food, and sleeping bags and set sail from San Francisco to Panama City. It was all smooth sailing until we hit a storm off of the coast of Guatemala that snapped some of our lines leaving us with just one sail.

Abir tracks our course up to the unavoidable storm!

Luckily we reached our final destination and were able to get our ship repaired and set sail through the Panama Canal to Haiti where we came eye to eye with a tsunami, yikes! Our quick-thinking crew quickly turned us round and set course toward Puerto Rico with our Uniform flag hoisted to let other ships know they were heading into danger.

Sylvester, Abir, and Quinn review the international code flags to determine which message we should send to other ships.

Make sure you’re following along #brightworksbeehive to see where our next adventure takes us or to watch tugboat and crow’s nest come to life.

But does it float?

The Amber Band has been taking a closer look at how water works. This week we visited the Marine Mammal Center, played around on Rodeo Beach, and took buoyancy experiments to the next level. All of these explorations gave us a chance to learn more about the physics and chemistry of water, in an attempt to better understand our relationship to it.

We kicked off the first day back from spring break at the beautiful Marine Mammal Center.

We got a chance to see how marine biologists conduct blood tests to learn about the health of the marine life they rescue, and some of the techniques they use to help prepare marine life to go back out into the wild.

After our visit to the Marine Mammal Center, we hiked down to Rodeo Beach for a picnic. We decided to spend the afternoon playing around on the beach. There were tide pools, watery caves, drift wood, and so much more for us to get up close and explore. We took the opportunity to reflect on this spectacular day with a few minutes of mindfulness. Students noticed all the colors in a handful of sand, the warmth of the sun, the sound of the waves, and the smell of salt in the air.

We found some tide pools at Rodeo Beach.

Having lunch on the side of a sea cliff.

Cartwheels on the beach are the best!

We found a jellyfish that had washed ashore.

There’s a whole world in a handful of sand!

Rhone found a small dead fish that had washed ashore too.

Back at Brightworks, we continued playing around in La Petit Mer (the epic test pool built by Indigo Band) to understand buoyancy and density. What do we need to know about density to be able to move through water? We started by designing and building a vessel that could maintain a neutral state of water (does not sink, does not float) while containing cargo weight of 50 grams or more. Once they figured that out, students began pushing those limits by finding ways to move their vessel forward, backward, up, and down—all without using their hands.

Measuring the mass and volume of our vessels to calculate their density.

How do you measure the volume of an oddly shaped object? Water displacement! Phillip showed Ambigo how to measure the water displacement of their vessels in a graduated cylinder to find the volume.

Clem and Audrey experimented with ways to make their submarines “breathe” to control when it floats and when it sinks.

Next week we’ll begin building our very own boat! Ambigo has decided to tackle a seemingly impossible mission by building a boat that will safely carry us to Angel Island. We begin building next week, and hope to have something ready to test in the bay by the following Friday. Before that though, we’ll get a chance to learn more about navigating in the water and “reading the water” on a surfing trip in Linda Mar.