BBS has a Spectrum of Stories to Share!

Blue through Amlet Bands brainstorming Expression Project ideas

Expression phase is looking a little different this year! With our new home, slight time setback, and adjustment in resources, Blue, Orange, Green, Teal, and members of Amlet decided to take Expression in a different direction, with group projects! In order to form these groups, we had students brainstorm ideas of anything and everything they wanted to do for Expression.

Story-Telling Group organizing our different interests and ideas

The Brightworks Broadcasting Service (B.B.S.) initially came together as a group of students who wanted to do storytelling for their Expression projects, under the aptly titled group name “Storytelling.” During our first brainstorm, kids shared out the different ways they wanted to tell stories—through a choose-your-own-adventure book, a skit, a nature show,  a graphic novel, a series of restaurant-reviews, a show about drawing. As we pieced together these different ideas, we decided to form our own broadcast station modeled after KQED and PBS. We called it BBS—the Brightworks Broadcasting Service! Our goal is to educate our community about fun, interesting and delicious activities and places around us.

We worked on our group declaration and presented to our peers our plans and ideas. As we did for Amlet and the other multi-band expression groups, we were assessed in the areas of:

  • Weekly Goals: How realistic and clear are the weekly goals presented for this project?
  • Resources: Does this project have clearly defined, realistic, and enough resources  in and out of our current space?
  • Research: Does this group have specific and relevant books, videos, and other media that can support the project?
  • Roles and Responsibilities: Are there enough clearly defined roles for all of the individuals in the group throughout the project?
  • Impact and Audience: Does this project help both creators and the community?
  • Magic: Does this project have that special something that we all look for in a project?
Emilio captures the mission state of BBS

We received incredibly thoughtful and helpful feedback from Amlet and our friends in the SF Models group…and were approved! Our work was cut out for us with just 6 total weeks left of school and a variety of days out and about, and so, BBS set to work!

Lisa and BBS planning out our 6 weeks of Expression work

Made up of Ramses (Green), Nolan (Orange), Emilio (Orange), Thomes (Teal), Charley (Orange), Apollo (Green), Dash (Blue), Sakira (Green), Amiya (Amber) and Erik (Violet), the BBS crew is creating the following shows for the public’s viewing pleasure:

Research is an important component of show writing
  • Bugs and Small Animals with Dash: a nature show that features our smallest friends found all around us
  • Sketch with Sakira: Sakira will host a drawing tutorial show for the art-lovers in our midst
  • Apollo’s Bite!: Apollo will sample and review a Tacolicious lunch for our audience’s enjoyment
  • Charley’s Comedy Corner: Charley’s love of comedy is infectious and will delight audience members of all ages and bands
  • Reading Rainbow with Thomes: Thomes will read aloud two original stories–a comic co-authored by Emilio and Nolan, and a choose-your-own-adventure story written by Jack Bloodstone
  • Synesthesia Studies with Erik: Erik will explore the concept of synesthesia, a condition in which one sense (for example, hearing) is simultaneously perceived as if by one or more additional senses (such as sight).

Amiya is filling the role of producer for these educational and fun shows, working with each show writer to create and maintain a pre-production and filming schedule, as well as providing general feedback and support.

Apollo interviewed a manager at Tacolicious for his review on the restaurant – tune in for his take on pastrami tacos!
Sakira and her film crew films her intro and outro for Sketch with Sakira

With our line up set and students excited to get going, we spent our first two weeks preparing for filming days. Show writers considered the intended audience and purpose for their shows before they began writing preliminary scripts, scouted locations, and reached out to experts and the community. Our authors worked on first and second iterations of their stories, writing furiously and voluminously. Preliminary shots were taken and shows were really starting to come together. We just needed a little inspiration and background understanding of just what makes public media so special.

BBS Crew giving feedback to our authors

And what better way for our fledgling public television station to prepare for our first broadcast than to visit KQED! BBS took a trip to San Francisco’s venerable radio and television station. We got an exclusive behind the scenes peek at all of the moving parts that go into public media!

Behind the scenes at KQED! Did you know the station uses one room to film many different shows?

Stay tuned for when we air our shows on June 3 and 4! BBS is sure to entertain, inform, and delight!

Inspirational People Who Have ⚡Sparked ⚡ Change!

Who are the change-makers we look up to? What are the changes these inspirational people have sparked in the world? Orange Banders dug deep into their stores of history and knowledge and identified an individual who has sparked change in the world to research and celebrate. Using the artwork of Kehinde Wiley as a model, kiddos created mixed media collage portraits of their Change-Maker to accompany a write up. ⚡


Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein is considered one of the most important  scientist of the 1900’s . Einstein was born on Friday, March 14th, 1879 and grew up in Germany. He went  to the school Luitpold Gymnasium, although he did not like school because his teachers would not let him think and daydream. Later on in his life he said after he got married he famously said, “My first love is thinking.” and that never changed.   Albert Einstein is known for helping explain how gravity works and how the planets move around the sun. albert got sick on Sunday, April 17th, 1955 with abdominal aortic aneurysm. Einstein refused any treatment. “I want to go when I want, I have done my share and it is time to go,” said Einstein. He died the next morning, Monday, April 18th, 1955 at age 76. I choose Albert Einstein as my person who sparked change because he was an amazing scientist.

By Lola Pizzato-Smith


Dwight D. Eisenhower

Dwight D. Eisenhower was an army general and a really awesome guy I like. Without him we would have not won World War II and we would have lost the space race. He was born on October 14, 1890, in Denison, Texas and went to West Point Army Academy  and then GRADUATED. He was the 34th president of the U.S. and said, “don’t join the book burners.” He was referring to the Nazis who ravaged Europe from 1939 to 1945. Their leader was Adolf Hitler who was alive from 1898-1945. Dwight D  was the supreme commander of the Allied forces in Europe and his GIs captured Wernher Von Braun who was a German who made a big Nazi terror weapon that killed a lot of people. This weapon was also called a wonder weapon by Hitler it was actually called V2 rocket. This was the first rocket to actually go past the stratosphere. Dwight D created NASA (National Space and Aeronautics Agency.) NASA used Wernher Von Braun’s knowledge of sending things to space to make the Saturn 5 – the spaceship that sent the US to the moon. Dwight D did get to see the success of NASA but from a hospital bed because of heart failure. He died on March 28, 1969, the same year Saturn 5 was actually launched. I think he is important because without him we wouldn’t have won World War II or the Space Race.

By Emilio Demartines


Michael Faraday

The history of Michael Faraday: he was born on 22/September/1791 in south London. In 1812 faraday sent a note to Humphry Davy, a famous scientist at the royal institution to be an assistant for Davy. sadly Davy turned him down but in 1813 he got a job as chemical assistant. A year later he was allowed to go on a trip with Davy and his wife on a European tour to France, Switzerland, Italy and Belgium meeting influential scientists. Michael faraday returned in 1815 and Faraday still worked at the royal institution helping other scientists with their experiments. Some years later in 1831 michael faraday made a groundbreaking discovery! He made a electromagnet motor showing the elements of electromagnetism. in the 1840s faraday’s health began to deplete. He saferd with memory loss and he began to not do as much working. He died on august/25/1867 at Hampton court. I love michael faraday because my school is having a spark ark and michael faraday was a electromagnetic scientist. I also love the way he worked and I love how he sparked change.

From the creator of this paragraph about Michael Faraday,

Devlin Diehl Hefti.


Supreme Court Hero

Maybe a necklace is just a necklace. Maybe a necklace is an awesome necklace. Maybe your necklace is a wedding gift. But for Ruth Bader Ginsburg, her necklace is a message. A lesson. A fortune.

Joan Ruth Bader was born on March, 15 1933. She had kicked A LOT, so her older sister nicknamed her Kiki. Her first name, Joan, seemed very ordinary for the 1930’s, so they started calling her by her middle name. She was just like any other ordinary baby. One day, after she turned one, going close on 2, her older sister died.

When she turned 17, at cornell university, she met martin david ginsburg, who’s room neighbored her’s. They got married in 1954. Her mother gave ruth bader good advice. “it sometimes helps to be a little deaf.” They moved to oklahoma. There, ruth’s husband went into war after ROTC. One day, she was taking a chemistry test at cornell university. because he was uncertain about her ability, her instructor said, “i’ll give you a practice exam.” So the next day the test was the practice exam, and she knew what he wanted in return.

She had her first child when she was 21, and was working in the social security office, but got demoted that job, for being a mother. Ruth and her husband went together to Harvard law school. At Harvard the law school dean tried to embarrass her once, by asking her, in front of other students, how she could “’justify’ taking a spot from a qualified man?” She was embarrassed, but said “my husband is a 2nd year law student, and it’s important to understand my husband’s work.”
She made the law review at Harvard, and transferred to columbia when her husband got a job in new york. She made the law review there too. Ruth graduated near the top of her law school class, but tried hard to get a job, largely due to sextual discrimination.

Ruth bader ginsburg got paid less for being married. Sadly, she lost her husband in 2010.

The end.

By Nolan McCormick


Mohandas Gandhi

I’m talking about Gandhi. He was born on October 2, 1869 in Porbandar, India. And Gandhi died January 30, 1948 in New Delhi, India. He best known for organizing non-violent civil rights protests. He was the 1930 Time Magazine Man of the Year. He was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize 5 times.Gandhi sparked change because He Helped made India not part of the UK. I chose Gandhi because I watched a movie about him and he seems like a really good guy

By Solin Visci


I.N.

Warning! This is about Isaac Newton who stood on the shoulders of …

Isaac Newton was born on January 4, 1643. He went to school in England. One of his quotes is: “If i have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants”. He is trying to say that he understood a lot of things because he built off the ideas of the scientists before him. When he was in his garden he saw an apple fall to the ground. Later he wondered if it was the tree or gravity that made the apple fall. In 1687 newton published the laws of gravitation. Isaac helped understand gravity. Gravity is the force that pulls things down.  There are laws of motion named after him. Say you kick a ball. the same force you put on the ball came from your foot. He died in 1727 at age 83. I choose Isaac because I was curious about him.

By Reyahn Bantia



Steve Martin

August 14, 1945 was when Steve was born and this is the start of Steve Martin’s short story. He was important because he made everyone laugh and now let’s begin. Steve was born in Waco Texas. He did not know a lot of comedy yet! His first job was at Disneyland. That’s how he got gigs. Also that was how he knew the lasso in the 3 Amigos. That is one of his famous films. After that he was a Smothers Brother and he won the Dating Game. After that hole jerney he was a comedian and actor. He made everyone laugh even the people who never laughed before! That’s a short story of Steve Martin

This is a quote from Steve Martin himself:

I’m tired of wasting letters when punctuation will do, period.

I chose this because I wanted to show you how funny he was, period.

By Arlo Montesano

Green and Orange Bands Study What Sparked Japanese Internment during WWII

Back during the Heart Arc, the Green and Orange bands visited the de Young Museum for the Weapons of Mass Seduction: The Art of Propaganda exhibit, which displayed propaganda art from WWI and WWII. Semi-inspired by this trip, Green and Orange decided to embark on a deeper exploration of what sparked the United States to get involved with World War II. From there, we took an even closer look at the question of what sparked the U.S.’s decision to intern hundreds of thousands of Japanese-Americans for several years during the War, an event that strongly impacted the West Coast of the United States, but is often not the focus in WWII discussions.

Apollo, Sadie and Soleil at the de Young’s Weapons of Mass Seduction exhibit during Heart Arc.

Because California was and continues to be one of the most densely populated states for Asian-Americans in the U.S., our Bands were very lucky to be able to attend so many field trips which specifically documented and paid tribute to the people and places affected by Japanese Internment. To kick off our study, we went to the Japanese American Museum of San Jose, where students learned not only about internment, but also about the history of Japanese immigration to the United States and even the specific history of Japanese people in San Jose. One of our docents, Yoshiko Kanazawa, was interned as a child, and so students were able to directly ask her questions about her experience. From Yoshiko, we heard not only about the lack of privacy at camp, which she considered to be one of the most challenging aspects, but also the variety of attitudes Japanese-Americans had towards being interned. For Yoshiko, her family encouraged her and her siblings to maintain a positive attitude and trust that they would only get stronger from their time in camp. She explained that other people at the camp were much angrier at the U.S. and felt that their imprisonment was hugely unjust and wanted to fight back, which lead to disagreements and resentment amongst the Japanese Americans.

Yoshiko Kanazawa giving a tour to Green Band at JAMsj.

The Green and Orange bands also attended the EXCLUSION: The Presidio’s Role in World War II Japanese American Incarceration exhibit in the Presidio, which gave students the opportunity to examine primary sources and artifacts related to our study. For example, the exhibit contained replicas of the first order issued by the Western Defense Command and Fourth Army Wartime Civil Control Administration to people of Japanese ancestry instructing them on their evacuation. These documents were published in the Presidio, and students engaged in an activity where they had to reflect on what it would feel like to see such a poster that may target their own ethnicity or background.

Blaise, Lars, Emilio and Lola looking for resources at the EXCLUSION exhibit in the Presidio.

Back in the Band Space, Green and Orange drew from a number of different sources on the events of Japanese-American internment in order to broaden and expand our understanding of these historical circumstances. We read My Dog Teny by Yoshito Wayne Osaki—a story about a young boy who had to leave his family dog behind when relocated to a camp, analyzed excerpts from A Young People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn which looked at the events leading up to WWII with a critical eye, watched historical videos that presented a more objective perspective, watched a Ted Talk by George Takei who was interned as a young child, and even listened to a song by Fort Minor which described the artist’s grandfather’s tragic experience in Manzanar. Perhaps our favorite source throughout the study was the historical-fiction graphic novel, Gaijin: American Prisoner of War by Matt Faulkner.

One of our in-school resources.

Gaijin told and illustrated the story of a young half-Japanese, half-white boy named Koji from San Francisco who is interned with his white mother at the Alameda Downs. Due to his biracial heritage, Koji is seen as an outsider, or “gaijin,” by people both inside and outside of the camp. While dealing with the hardships of being interned—including being bullied, missing his father, and feeling untrusting towards his mother, Koji struggles to find his identity. Through our reading of Gaijin, Greenies analyzed the book’s themes, images, language and characters, allowing us to further understand that, like Yoshiko had mentioned at the museum, every Japanese-American who was interned by the U.S. had their own individual experiences and responses to the events.

Sully (before he moved to Teal Band) reading Gaijin.

Our culminating field trip for our Japanese Internment exploration was our three-day journey to Lone Pine, CA, where we had the unique opportunity to visit Manzanar, one of the few camps (now a National Historic site) located in California. Driving roughly 10 hours, the brave students, collaborators and volunteer-parents stayed two nights in the town of Lone Pine, located in the Owens Valley, and spent one full day visiting Manzanar. At the Historical Site in Independence, CA, toured by Park Ranger Alisa, the students of Green and Orange were able to not only see the actual location of the camp, which was a dusty desert surrounded by the stunning and colossal mountains of the Sierra Nevadas, but also go inside the restructured barracks, latrine, and even have lunch in the original mess hall. In the visitor’s center, students learned about different individuals who were kept at Manzanar, and the struggles, tragedies, joys and successes they experienced during their time interned.

The Green and Orange Bands at Manzanar in Independence, CA.

Teamwork Makes the Dreamwork

Orange Banders celebrate after helping one another climb a wall, because..why not?!?

What is at the heart of all of the work we do as a band? Teamwork, of course!

Inherent in all that we do to articulate and express our individual personalities, passions, and interests is the need to know ourselves best so that we can work with others better.

Our work on projects in the shop are so often dependent on teamwork

The Orange Band has been tackling what good teamwork looks like, sounds like, and feels like throughout all of our provocations and projects in this Heart Arc. Each week, students participated in a variety of different team-building activities. The experiences we collected in each of these activities, reflecting both our successes and areas for growth, have been in our minds and hearts as we continue to understand what it means for this group of diverse thinkers and learners to work as a cohesive, kind, and supportive unit.

How do teammates communicate ideas in kind ways?

Solin works on building a tower of dry spaghetti sticks strong enough to hold a marshmallow on top!

Ah, but four hands are even better than two!

Sometimes time constraints lead to “ah ha!” moments

Nolan puts his idea to work!

How do we combine the different ideas of a team?

Reyahn, Lola, Lars, and Arlo check in about the strategies they have seen work.

Lucky for this team, there are experienced spaghetti architects on hand

Yes! Success!!!

After a few different team challenges, Orange Banders began to list out the Qualities of Good Teamwork that we saw in each other and ourselves.

Crossing the River – how do you work as team of eight on ONE challenge that calls for group success, not just that of an individual?

Solin gets across the “river” ONLY with the combined help and strategies of the group

Lola lays out the next stepping stone before returning to the shore

Lars sets up the next kiddo to cross behind him

Are we on the same page as our teammates?

A group of three means three times the ideas

Partnerships naturally leads to collaboration and joint decision making

This list then helped to inform how the Orange Band created a Teamwork Rubric, identifying the following areas:

  • Staying Positive
  • Being Helpful
  • Communication and Listening
  • Building Off Other’s Ideas

Once kiddos created these four different categories for our work together, we began to find the language and actions that showed the range of how we might fall into each category on a given day, during a given activity. We recognized that each day we are together is a unique moment in time, a crystallized, joint experience. Some days we might find ourselves truly Growing into ourselves as team members. Other days, we are just like Seedlings, at the very start of our journey as a productive and kind teammate. And all times we might also be in a stage of Sprouting, somewhere in between.

After creating a first version of a Teamwork Rubric, Orange Banders self-assessed themselves, individually and as a whole band. We found that we needed to tweak the attributes of the different Teamwork categories here and there. We also noted that we could show a range of teamwork qualities in one activity!

The latest and greatest version of the Orange Band Teamwork Rubric!

With kindness–towards ourselves and others–and productivity our biggest aims, we will surely continue to revise and add to our understanding of what makes a good team and a good team member. As we move into our final weeks of this Heart Arc together, one thing is certain: in the Orange Band, teamwork most definitely makes the dreamwork!

💜 Happy New Year! 💜

What better arc to begin a year of learning, exploring, and wondering together than the 💜 Heart Arc 💜?

Finding hearts wherever we go!

The Orange Band opened this year of Luminosity by sharing aspects of themselves. Even though many in our group have known each other for years, we still found ways to surprise one another. With new students joining our Brightworks family, we were also able to share those stories, tried and true, that have marked our times together.

Name Stories

Devlin and Arlo creating their Name Story pieces

A saying of  the Swampy Cree people is that “to say the name is to begin the story.” And, so, the Orange Band began our time together by  sharing the stories that our names carry: the ideas, family lore, hopes, and dreams of our names. Students created Name Story pieces that reflected those most important aspects of themselves and took time to share, ask questions, and find commonalities among us.

Lars shares his ideal home, complete with llama hanging around, with his name story piece

Nolan listens to Solin share the hows and whys of her name story

Reyahn takes Lars through the intricate designs that emerged from his name

Arlo’s love of “classic” movies from the ’80s featured heavily in his name story piece

Devlin colored his name story to reflect the present: member of the Orange Band (and proud!)

 

Circles of Me

Our work in sharing our Name Stories led us to begin to identify the many aspects that comprise each of us. Who are we, as we see ourselves? Who are we, as we think and know others see us? Orange Banders contemplated the Many Circles of ME – the most relevant and influential parts that make up our multitudinous selves. These circles sparked memories of moments in which a particular circle stood out vividly, sending kiddos to their journals to write about those recollections.

Animal Styles

Can you put your fingers near the animal styles that most reflect you??

Orange Banders also took to inspiration from animals in the wild to self identify their communication styles. Are you a wolf, a member of a collective, ready to strategize and plan out before making a move? Or, are you a turtle, an independent worker amongst a sea of others, needing both the protection of the group AND the ability to operate on your own? We asked ourselves if perhaps, the tiger was more our style: vocal, at times intimidating, and needing to be self-aware of body language and tone. Some of us resonated with the rabbit, full of boundless energy and ideas and ready to jump from one topic to another.

We also realized that we can change from one type of animal communicator to another, dependent upon time and place.

Sometimes you feel like a tiger…sometimes you feel like a turtle!

Knowing that we have such a wealth of communication styles will be crucial as we move forward in our year of learning, exploring, and making together. So, too, will Band Agreements that we feel we can live with and support each other in meeting.

Signed, Sealed, Delivered!

At the 💜 Heart 💜 of Our Journeys

Solin and Lola take in the view on our first field trip: to Bernal Heights Park!

What lies at the heart of our work together? Surely, to know one another and ourselves that much better is an important aim. As we meander through this first arc, we find what is most valuable–we find that heart. This coupling of journeys and introspection has long been represented by the ancient labyrinth.

The Orange Banders visited their first of many labyrinths this arc in our field trip to Bernal Heights Park’s labyrinth. With the words and images of Byrd Baylor and Peter Parnell’s beautiful story, The Other Way to Listen, in mind, kiddos walked the labyrinth and journaled the sounds and images that came to them in solo, circuitous ambles; each journey unique to the walker as they made their way to the heart of the labyrinth and back out again.

Orange Banders on high!

A City Built from Scratch

When a city is created where there was none before, what are the considerations of those building the city?


This arc, Orange Banders were introduced to the city of Kalu Yala, a city being built in the jungles of Panama by a group of individuals interested in building “the world’s most sustainable city.”

After an introduction to the project by Orange Band helper and friend, Jessica, who worked and lived in Kalu Yala as part of her college work, the kiddos brainstormed a number of questions they had for the group involved in the project.


Resources (Water/Food)

Safety + Health

Education

Impact + Effects

Social + Population


To say that their questions were insightful and reflective of a deep understanding of the intricacies of how a city comes into being – and, perhaps, why and if it should come into being – would be a gross understatement…

Orange Band’s Questions About/For Kalu Yala

  1. What is the relationship between the city and the indigenous people?
  2. Do they have a stable plumbing system?
  3. How was it funded? Where did money for materials come from?
  4. How do they filter water? What is the water source?
  5. Is this a good idea for the indigenous people?
  6. What would they do if there was a natural disaster?
  7. Would you call this colonization? Why or why not?
  8. What inspired this project? Why Panama?
  9. How was the group allowed to build in Panama?
  10. How will this affect the animals/nature of the area?
  11. What will they do about medical emergencies/outbreaks?
  12. How will Kalu Yala affect the world?
  13. What are buildings made from?
  14. Who was living there before? Is it the same population of Kalu Yala now?
  15. Is Kalu Yala in a high-risk zone? What are emergency procedures/protocols?
  16. Who gets to live there?
  17. What does a completely sustainable city mean?
  18. Do they vaccinate?
  19. Where do the teachers for the school and teacher prep program come from?
  20. How do they respond to animal threats?
  21. Is there a cap on the number of people that the city can sustain? How will they decide how many people get to live there? How will they decide who gets to stay and who has to leave?

Get Lost! Hike Through Golden Gate Park

 

Rain was firmly forecasted, but Blue and Orange brought the sun and blue skies to their trek through Golden Gate Park!

The first few weeks of the City Arc have been map-filled, to say the least. Both Blue and Orange Bands have dug into maps of all kinds, studying perspectives, purposes, and the quirks and idiosyncrasies of maps. We have drawn maps, collected data to add to maps, and thought about how maps reflect the spaces and places they represent.

We decided we need to test out maps in the field. And, to do that, we needed to get lost-in the wild!

The task: Find your group’s way through Golden Gate Park from one distinct departure to the final destination: the Chinese Pavilion at Stow Lake.

 

The bands met in groups of four and planned out their routes from Lindley Meadow, Metson Lake, Kezar Stadium, and the Conservatory of Flowers.

The Gamers began at the Conservatory of Flowers

One of the first tasks was to find both the starting and ending locations on the map

The Lightning Puppies debated the best route, trying to take into account foot traffic

The Dancing Sushis plotted a trek from Metson Lake to Stow Lake

The next day, we aimed to GET LOST! Rain greeted us as we made our way across town to Golden Gate Park (although we truly lucked out in the weather department by the time we arrived!).

Lightning Puppies: Intrepid explorers of urban green spaces!

Challenge #1 upon landing: Where ARE we??

 

Ah! There we are!!

Using landmarks such as other meadows and lakes was super helpful

But orienting ourselves with the map proved to be the biggest challenge when we were en route

Thankfully, the city provided some clear cut signs we were on the right track!

Even so, some signs were almost TOO big to be noticed! The Lightning Puppies debated for quite a while about whether they had arrived, while standing right in front of this sign! They figured out they were arrived pretty quickly

Scouting ahead was a strategy some groups took full advantage of

This looks familiar!!

Geese were our first greeters as groups made their way around the lake

The Dancing Sushis were the FIRST group to make their way to the Chinese Pavilion (not pictured)

More groups arrived and made for great rock hopping fun

Reunited, at last!

Success at getting found DEFINITELY calls for fro-yo!

 

All in all, it was an amazing adventure in the City! Blue and Orange got to test out their map skills in the wilds of the Sunset and Richmond Districts, and hone their collaboration and compromise skills (aka, YES! to Teamwork!).