#redheart

Let’s take a closer look at how our youngest community members are approaching this years first arc 💜. We started our exploration with a few questions. So what is a question?

I prompted the kids with question starters such as: how, why, I wonder, and I don’t know. 

We simplified our questions down to three fill in the blanks: How do X’s hearts works? Why do X’s have hearts? and I don’t know (why our hearts are the size of our fists)?

Once we asked our questions we illustrated them.

Next up we looked to our library of body books for answers.

Rich’s first science lesson included heart parts courtesy of chickens passed, veins, and heartbeats.

Once we had our questions and some concrete answers to a couple of our questions we asked, How might we see a heart in action?  Models, videos, and X-rays were possible solutions. Rich stepped in with some plastic tubing and a hand pump to give us a simulated experience- we added the red food coloring, for accuracy of course.

Our second lesson helped us see how a heart pumps blood out to the body and how it circulates back to the heart.

Early on I asked the kids what they thought a 💜 symbol meant. We thought it might show that you like or love someone or something. Such a wonderful place to start. We continued with this idea of what we might love or like and read Uugghh by Claudia Boldt. This story of a slimy slug who worries he might not be loved. A confident spider helps slug learn that beauty is in the eye of the beholder, starting with yourself, and learns that everyone’s opinions differ from finding beauty in red, the postman, or poo. Together we brainstormed what we thought might be beautiful like dresses, castles, and worms. In the end we realized that our idea of beautiful began with a feeling we had tied to these feel-good and feel-happy objects. So on to our feelings we went. Each day we read a short story about a different feeling and tried to think of why those characters felt that way or a time we also felt that way. Then we took a picture to help other’s see what our feelings might look like.

💜 got us off to an exciting start to the year and was rounded out by our outdoor adventure! I wonder what ⚡️ will bring?

#bwxcredo rollout

Welcome to the 2018-2019 school year everyone! Last spring Justine helped the students form our first iteration of the Brightworks Student Council. Together they created a questionnaire that went out to each member of the school and in the Hive we worked together to answer questions like: What do you enjoy most about BWX? When do you feel supported at BWX? What makes you feel safe at BWX?

The responses were reviewed and condensed into our first version of the Brightworks Credo that was presented to the staff in August. During our setup weeks, the staff worked together to solidify language that would reach community members of all ages which we lovingly named our Credo, a set of 10 values we hope all members of the Brightworks family can work towards. Throughout our first month of school each band worked to present each point of the credo to the whole school during morning circle and an encore performance in the Hive during snack time with the Yellow band presenting the Hive’s work at the Orchard.

We try to do the best we can whenever we can.

We co-author our learning and are here to participate and learn from each other.

We welcome and explore new ideas, perspectives and beliefs.

We take care of our school space and share materials so that we can learn together.

We treat ourselves and others kindly.

We build relationships that are protective and flexible to ensure that everyone feels accepted without conditions or fear of judgement.

We see each other as individuals and understand that our experiences impact how we learn and what we need.

We give the benefit of the doubt and acknowledge intent.

We listen to understand how our words or actions impact others and take steps to support each other.
We give props. ‘Cause it feels good when we do things.

What a way to kick off the year. This year we will use our credo as our group agreements in the Hive. We have also turned our doors into our wall of fame covered by the faces of our wonderful community. We are looking forward to planning our puppeteering day with Indigo, art with Violet, stop-motion with Amber, and so many more exciting cross-band experiences this year!

The Road to Red Explorations

The Red Band kicked off #bwxcity with our all-school Big Bus Tour back in February and have been exploring ever since.

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On the hunt for murals in our neighborhood- learning about commissioned work versus graffiti

Beginning with a neighborhood walk we learned that our neighborhood provides space for homes of all types (apartment buildings, duplexes, and single family homes), work spaces (art studios, coffee shops, and a big bakery- Hello Panorama Bread, we smell you), and our school. Beginning with Maybe Something Beautiful by F. Isabel Campoy, we have started a study on the public art available to our city. During our neighborhood walks we noticed that we have a good amount of public art within a two-block radius of our school; murals by local artist Sirron Norris are easily recognizable by their big blue bears, the work of Project Artaud is on display all down 17th street, and commissioned and permission-ed giant works of art all in our neighborhood. We’ve even made a few paper and chalk pieces of our own to share on Bryant Street. We continue to be on the look out for murals, graffiti, and statues during our field trips as we discuss, What is art?

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Painting rocks to brighten up the front of the Hive

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We have been out and about each week with each trip bringing us to some real gems in our city such as: the Bernal Heights Library Branch to start our City book collection, the Randall Museum to learn about some of the other inhabitants of San Francisco, and Niantic Labs to learn about augmented reality.

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After our presentation on augmented reality we met a giant Snorlax

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After a short rain storm we arrived at the Randall Museum to learn about mammals, amphibians, and reptiles found both in and out of San Francisco

Our enthusiasm to learn more about the shared spaces in our community and city has taken us to our local parks and playgrounds: Bernal Heights Park and rec center playground, a rained our Corona Heights Park, Transamerica Redwood Park, gardens of the Financial District, and the playground at Sue Bierman Park. With more trips on the horizon we will continue to explore the design and value of these communal spaces.

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A sunny day of hiking, meeting dogs, dancing, and digging at Bernal Heights Park

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A mini redwood forest in the middle of the Financial District- Transamerica Redwood Park

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“We saw this playground from the bus !” During our Big Bus tour

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Until next time…

 

Red Band Book Chats

In January the Red band added weekly book chats to our Writer’s Workshop schedule. Each session offers the kids an opportunity to share their opinions, feelings, and make connections with the books we read. As we work to build on and connect to the stories we read we have added entries to our journals and been inspired to create our own pieces of art to share with our community.

 

Find out who is keeping the old man on the top floor awake and what types of noises we hear in our own homes.

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by F. Isabel Campoy and Theresa Howell illustrated by Rafael López

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Based on the Urban Art Trail in San Diego, we learn how a splash of color can change a community. We made drawings to hang on Bryant Street, made chalk drawings, and painted rocks for the front of the Hive.

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I can’t wait to see what other types of connections these kids find and bring to our City studies!

Cloth Catch-up

Hello again from the Hive. We’ve been buzzing right along in the Hive moving from exploration into expression. While the Hive tried their hand at many different aspects of working with cloth we landed on the expression of stories using cloth with puppets. Along with puppeteering expert Daniel Gill, the kids have learned how to animate  a variety of puppets from pieces of cloth to mouth plates, hand puppets, marionettes, and stick puppets with the main idea being, anything can be a puppet. Each lesson has taught us a new skills to move, animate, and bring to life the characters we create.

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Lesson 1: Get Creative

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Lesson 2: Anything Can Be A Puppet

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Lesson 3: Bringing Your Puppet To Life

Our first iteration of our puppet theater evolved from a window to adding wings for waiting behind the scenes. Next a second panel was added to provide a place for backgrounds to hang as well as the possibility of using marionettes. Our first planning meeting of the second iteration of the puppet theater was about outlining the work the kids had done so far and labeling parts in order to create a cut list for our plywood. We then added the constraints that the puppet theater be able to close flat for storage. While we still have work to do with accessorizing the puppet theater, we had our first kid test on Friday. We even used our projector to play with shadows and add backgrounds.

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Stay tuned to see our final edits and additions for the puppet theater!

Story Plays and Cloth Beginnings

Hello everyone! Welcome back to the Red Band blog. Can you believe we are already at fall break? Last month we bid farewell to our friend Piper and welcomed Kimberly and Daniel into the Hive. We did so much baking to support relief efforts for our neighbors to the north in Sonoma County we were able to donate $100 to the Redwood Credit Union Community Fund. We spent two nights near the seashore at NatureBridge, some of us for the first time without our parents. We’ve kicked off Cloth by adding weaving, sewing, cutting, gluing, and knotting to our skill sets.

Our first attempt at measuring and cutting fabric

Exploring our first Cloth question, How can you connect two materials?

Costumer designer Tiff came to visit and share some of her work

The kids worked on circle bags during morning centers

And we’ve introduced project time in the Hive, these are one hour guided experiences led by Kimberly or me. So far we have made stuffies, skirts, dog shirts, and pillows. We’re hand-stitching, sewing machine-powering people now!

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Also new to the Hive has been the introduction of Story Plays with Liz. Each child will have the opportunity to share a story straight from their imagination to share with the entire Hive. After the story has been dictated to Liz, the child identifies the characters of the story who will later be played by their Hivemates. During our closing circle the children will hear the story read aloud and can then choose to become an actor!

Stayed tuned for more Cloth adventures with the #brightworksbeehive!

Author’s, Illustrators, and Coins, Oh My!

My favorite reasons for why I work with young children are their endless imaginations and their innate courage. The last two weeks in the Hive have been filled with brave moments: saying hello to someone new, asking for a name when you’ve forgotten, trying a new game, eating lunch at the Orchard, and sharing the stories of your life. We have started our adventures in writing with Lucy Calkins’ Writer’s Workshop. The Hive’s Writer’s Workshop is a time for everyone to become an author and illustrator. Our first few lessons have included: How do you get ready for school? along with a morning of sharing their work. What did you do over the weekend?

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Bo and Hayes work on their first entires for The Story of My Stuff

And our latest adventure The Story of My Stuff was inspired by a gallery visit I had about a year ago. I learned about a project related to consumption by Kate Bingaman-Burt called Obsessive Consumption which documented everything she purchased over the course of three years. I was fortunate enough to catch her show at Mule Gallery and picked up her zine “Belongings: Stories that Belong to the Stuff that Belongs to Us”. Here you get a glimpse of  Zachary Schomburg and Bingaman-Burt’s stuff and the stories of each treasured item as illustrated by Bingaman-Burt.

We had a conversation around what it means own something and I shared the story of the owl keychain that lives in the Hive, a left-behind gift of our friend Octavia who used to go to Brightworks. Our writer’s set off to show their own valuables: teddy bears, houses, and pet quails. Each item accompanied by a lovely story of how it became theirs. We will continue to dive into the story of our stuff this week as we prepare our final coin explorations.

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Christian chose his Gengar Pokemon card as one valuable object. He even taught us about its strength and powers

Also did you know we’re studying coins around here? What is a coin? What are the parts of a coin? And how do they work? These questions have been examined in order to have us reach the goal of designing our own coins. We identified the parts of the coins as: location where it was made, year it was made, its value, a VIP, and a valuable item of our country. For the purposes of our coins, we chose S for the San Francisco mint, our birth years: 1985, 1986, 2011, and 2012 respectively, our faces- because we’re VIPs, and from our identified items from our Story of My Stuff writing we added an item that was valuable to us to the back of our coins.

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Kit adds to her heads-side of her Kit-coin; first her portrait then an S for San Francisco

What a wild ride, five weeks have come and gone. Up next we are gearing up to head out on our first field trip of the year which happens to be our overnight stay at Nature Bridge just across the Golden Gate Bridge. Stay tuned!