Yellow Band: Coin, Week 5

Remember last week when I said we had something very exciting in the works? For my last week here at the Institute for Applied Tinkering, the Yellow Band and I decided to do something fun, exciting and meaningful. Out with a bang, as they say!

Christian carefully carves his potato stamp coin.

May carefully spreads ink onto her potato stamp coin.

Kit and Icee help clean up from our potato stamp center. Thank you!

Faris tries out his 3 cent potato stamp coin.

Great work, Faris!

As you may remember from last week’s blog, the Yellow Band spent has been learning about children in different countries, thinking about what’s important to us, and what’s important to them. We discovered that though these kids might eat different foods from us, get to school differently, wear different clothes and live in different types of houses, on the inside we all have a lot in common.

Then, we read some news articles about Hurricane Maria’s destruction in Puerto Rico, flipped through an issue of Faces Magazine, and read about the island’s potential to become the 51st state–because there’s a lot more to Puerto Rico than Hurricane Maria. We talked about how the children in Puerto Rico wouldn’t be able to return to school for weeks, if not months, and brainstormed ways we could help them out. Puerto Rico is a small island in the Caribbean, what we could do? Answer: BAKE SALE!

Khalilah signs the letter we wrote to send along with our donation.

Oh my goodness! This was such an exciting possibility! And, what a great way to use our bandspace’s little kitchen for the first time. Everyone got so pumped. We went about our daily business, planning bit by bit. We decided we should have one sale on Friday, and maybe another on the night of the Fall Potluck. We knew we needed to make a few kinds of things–something vegan, something nut-free, something gluten-free, and something with anything. And this is the menu we chose: vegan cupcakes, gluten-free chocolate chip cookies, nut-free brownies, and Nathan’s special banana bread, yum! We also decided that everything should cost $1.50, because that’s how much stuff costs at Daiso ūüėČ

On Thursday we finally got to start baking! We measured, stirred, and cracked; we poured, scraped and spread. It was marvelous! And while the kiddos were away at the park, I tucked everything into the oven, just to make sure the bandspace smelled irresistible when they returned.

Dash helps Kit level off one cup of flour.

Calvin carefully measures out 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract.

Oh my goodness, when I told Sylvester to put the soymilk in the refrigerator, ‘wherever it would fit,’ he accidentally put it in the freezer! Here he is cutting open the container so we can melt the soymilk on the stove. Mistakes are welcome!

Sometimes you’ve gotta get creative when it comes to giving everyone a job. Here, May dumps in flour one scoop at a time. Then, Ronin raises the mixing bowl. Finally, Faris turns on the mixer and watches until all of the flour is incorporated. Repeat! Great collaboration you three!

On Friday, we could hardly contain ourselves! All of the things we made looked sososo good, but we knew we needed to wait till the bake sale. We put finishing touches on our cupcakes, cut the brownies into bars, and arranged all of the cookies on a baking sheet. After a quick dance party, it was finally time to set-up for the sale!

May and Ronin went next door with me to get our table ready and ask Justine for some quarters from petty cash so we could make change for folks.

Meanwhile, back at the Beehive, Kit and Icee spread icing onto the cupcakes and sugar cookies.

And then it was time for the sale! Thank you so much to Nicole for helping make change for eager purchasers while I went in for closing circle!

We almost sold out of everything!

Luckily, there were a few cupcakes and cookies left for us to relish in the success of our bake sale when it finally came to an end.

And oh my goodness we blew right past our modest goal of $50! We raised a whopping $84.50!!!

We donated the money raised to UNICEF’s operations in Puerto Rico. The money will go toward providing medication, clean water, shelter and food to children in need.

And that’s the story of the bake sale. The story of the bake sale is also the story of the Yellow Band’s exploration of Coin this arc. We approached this arc topic as historians, anthropologists and philosophers, considering the origins of money, the different types of money used by different civilizations throughout history, and the purpose of money. We emphasized throughout that money is a tool, and around the world folks lead very different lives, yet on the inside we have a lot in common.

Okidoke my friends, we’ve come to the end. It’s been really, really real. Nothing will ever be like my time here at the Institute for Applied Tinkering; I’ve welded with 8 year olds, built a child-sized, see through model of the human body (and filled it with felt, paracord and lego guts), contemplated friendship, travelled the Underground Railroad and California Trail, and so much more. Now, I’m travelling just down the street, please come and visit at CCA.

Love,

Piper

Yellow Band: Coin Arc, Weeks 3&4

What is important to you? What do you think is important to folks living on other countries? What are some of the things humans have historically used as a means of exchange? Why? What makes a piece of paper worth 5 or 10 or 100 dollars?

Abir works on filling in a venn diagram comparing himself with Anu, from the book This Is How We Do It.

During our first Class Meeting, we read Kevin Henkes’ great book Chrysanthemum, then took a moment to share our name stories. Some kiddos were a little shy to share at first, but when I asked Ronin if his name was connected to Japanese samurai tradition he opened right up!

Those are a few of the questions we’ve been contemplating the past few weeks. As we get deeper into Coin, get accustomed to our bandspace and routines, we’ve started to go deeper into some arc-related topics. We’ve even started to think about value: where it comes from, what we value and what others value. As we go, we continue to practice our routines–morning centers and afternoon choices, getting ready for park, using the library–and have even incorporated some arc-related activities as we build and expand on our competencies; we even started Writers’ Workshop and Class Meeting!

Kit explores the different values of the cuisenaire rods–my favorite math tool!

One of the first books we read together this arc is called The Story of Money, and while some of its concepts are a bit outdated, it outlines the transition from barter economies to money-based economies. (Although there is some question now as to whether there ever truly were entirely barter based economies!) This story based explanation of the emergence of mediums for exchange like salt, shell beads, barley and silver, and then the transition to coins and finally paper money really helped the Yellow Banders connect these dots. By the end of the book, we could all confidently say “The Chinese paper money had value because the people were ordered to use it!” This was the first step into some of our next conversations about value.

Ronin’s venn diagram starts to show some of the differences between his life here in San Francisco and Kei’s life in Japan. He’s pretty sure she likes Pokemon too though!

In order to start to make some inferences about different values, we would need to learn about the lives of other people though. So, we started reading this awesome book! This Is How We Do It is one of my favorite finds for this arc. I love the way it objectively tells the story of a day in the live of children around the world. Paired with beautiful illustrations, the kiddos were captivated.

In the meantime, we’ve kept up with our routines of centers in the morning, and choices in the afternoons. We’ve explored playdough, painting, tons of different games, and started Writers’ Workshop Tuesday and Thursday mornings. The Yellow Band specifically is starting to learn some decoding strategies, woven through our morning messages at our morning meeting, and taking these skills to our literacy centers on Tuesdays and Thursdays. This week, we started to learn about closed syllables, consonant-vowel-consonant patterns (CVC).

May brainstorms some story ideas she might like to write about this year. Is that an idea for a space story?

Calvin and Khalilah didn’t waste a minute! They got right to work writing a story about what else, CATS!

We all practiced playing Boggle together, focusing on searching for closed syllable words that follow the CVC pattern. We found some real words and some nonsense words–why not?!

Magnet magic!

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This week finished up with a community lunch served up by none other than our own Sylvester–thank you friend!

Sylvester helps serve up his dad’s special enchiladas–yum!

It’s hard to believe it’s already almost the end of the Coin Arc! Stay tuned for a very exciting plan we have for next week…

Yellow Band: Coin, Weeks 1&2

Welcome back everyone! We’ve had a wonderful first few weeks in the Beehive. It’s been so much fun to see all of our returning Red Banders (now in Yellow!) and welcome our newest members of the Brightworks family into the Red Band.

Calvin, Abir, Sylvester and Kit stay cool by playing in the water table in the courtyard of the Beehive.

I know this is going to sound out of character, but things have been moving super s-l-o-w. Nathan, Nicole and I have carefully and intentionally introduced routines, norms and materials in order to teach these kiddos simply how to be here at school with us. Things that I might otherwise squeeze into the first two weeks, we’ve spread way out. This way, we have plenty of time to practice each skill as we add them and revisit materials frequently before moving on.

Pattern blocks are one of our favorite materials! We’ve been exploring some of the many possibilities of these blocks in our morning centers. Here Sylvester shows the vertical structure he tried to build using the blocks.

And Abir wrote his name with cuisenaire rods! I love how he replaced a few blocks with equivalents made up of a few blocks. That skill will come in handy later!

May is painting! We’re hoping to have a whole lot more painting this year!

At the beginning of this week, we started to get out some of our favorite board games. Here, Khalilah and Calvin face off in chess. Great job you two!

We’re also just getting to know each other! Dash and Isis take some calls at lunch.

Over the summer, Nathan and Nicole attended a workshop on the Responsive Classroom model for social and emotional learning in elementary classrooms. I used this model in my previous school. so it’s been great to work alongside them to make our classroom more cohesive in our approach to the flow of our day, how we introduce new materials, and how we handle misbehavior. We start our days with morning meeting, then move to centers. After park and lunch, each band usually reads a book together at quiet time. Then, our afternoons are choice time. Instead of moving through timed centers, Red and Yellow banders can go deeper into an activity they explored in the morning.

We also tried coin rubbing. Sylvester shows a coin that came out particularly well.

We also introduced a coin counting and trading game that we’re calling ‘Funny Money.’ Roll the dice, and collect the number of pennies indicated. Trade for more valuable coins if you want! Try to make it to a dollar! Here, Dash checks the dice, and records his roll.

Oh! And we went on our first field trip! Since it’s the Coin arc and Daiso is only 3 blocks away, I decided I should let these lucky kiddos choose their own school supplies. I went in advance to scout out the options and prices, and decided on a budget of $6 for each kiddo to choose: 1 journal with lines, 1 journal with blank pages or grid, one pencil bag, and a pencil sharpener (if you can find it). This trip was such a blast! I would definitely do this again, why not?

Ronin searches for the perfect pencil bag.

We found the cat stuff!

May hunts for the perfect last thing.

Abir the bargain hunter was able to get a pencil sharpener and a set of push pencils in addition to his notebooks and pencil bag!

The next morning, we used pattern blocks to help us add up the prices of our items (and see if we all were able to stay within our budget!).

Finally, we finished up this week with a dance party, because why not?!

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Yellow Band: by Sea, weeks 11 & 12

The last few weeks have been so much fun! As the crow’s nest and tugboat started to wrap up, we didn’t quite have enough time to start some new projects from scratch. But, we started an exploration that we hadn’t gotten to yet–lighthouses and shipwrecks. Because why not?

As long as people have been traveling and transporting, boats have been wrecking along rocky shorelines and invisible reefs and in bad weather with low visibility. And, as long as boats have been wrecking, people have been trying to figure out different ways to protect sailors and mariners from unseen dangers. With lighthouses, bells, foghorns, and even fires burning from beaches humans have tried to light the way toward safety. And, the Bay area is a great place to explore some of these physical structures and research their successes and failures.

At Pt. Bonita light in the Marin Headlands. Most recommend!

At Lands End, where we could see the wreck of the Frank Buck, Lyman Stewart and Mile Rock, where the SS City of Rio de Janeiro all wrecked.

One piece of this exploration was light itself: how does it work, and how can we magnify it to light the way on dark nights? We spent some time playing with lenses and color in order to explore some of the properties of light.

We tried to separate black ink into it’s component colors, but it turned out our black markers were actually very dark blue.

Then, we made spinners with each color of the rainbow. We observed that if we could spin them fast enough, the colors would blend together to look white, like light!

And of course we took a few lenses outside to experiment with focusing light.

Another piece of this exploration was architectural: how can we build a tall tower that is also strong enough to stand up to pounding waves, unrelenting wind and rain?

Oscar thought he’d simulate a tall cliff by the ocean by building his lighthouse tower on a stool. This also gave us a great way to test and see how strong his structure was!

Sakira quickly realized that she’d need to add layers of blocks to her structure in order to make it stand up to the wind (aka her hand).

Solin carefully drew the tower that she and Reyahn built together in her journal.

Oscar then enlisted Emilio and Devlin to help him reinforce his initial simple designs with layers and layers of blocks. They also decided to keep their tower short, because it was already on top of a tall rock.

After our trip to Pt. Bonita, we realized the sheer magnitude of the number of shipwrecks around the Golden Gate (around 300!). Some quick internet research¬†revealed that we could get pretty close to a few of these wrecks by taking a trip out to Lands End. So that’s just what we did!

We got there right on time for low tide! In this photo, you can see all that remains of the Frank Buck–its steam engines–poking out of the water.

We hurried down to Mile Rock Beach, to get as close to a few wrecks as we could.

Countless ships have met their fate along these rocks, and the stretch from Seal Rock to Fort Point has been especially deadly.

And we climbed around a lot too! We couldn’t have asked for better weather!

Oh, and we stopped by for a quick walk through the labyrinth before heading back to the bus.

This week, we focused on researching and experimenting with a particularly damaging type of shipwrecks: when oil tankers wreck and leak crude oil into marine environments. We started to learn a bit about the wreck of the Exxon Valdez in 1989, which left a lasting impression for many. The entire school has been talking about how to be more responsible with our waste–from being mindful that we put our trash into the proper bin, to ways we can minimize waste–so this turn in the exploration fit right in. Plus, some of the chemistry experiments we got to do were really messy and fun!

Devlin and Reyahn work on making a boom to contain some ‘crude oil’ in their tin tray.

Oh no! The oil was able to sneak across Emilio’s boom!

Cleaning up oil spills is hard! Emilio tried to make a boom float on the water, but although the cardboard could soak up oil, it didn’t keep the oil from sneaking across to the ‘clean’ water.

And now we’re already getting ready for Expo! Stay tuned!

Yellow Band: by Sea, Weeks 9 & 10

This week, let’s check out some of the work we’ve been doing on our projects! Two of our bigger, group projects this arc have been a tugboat and a crow’s nest. Because BOATS.

Reyahn, Quinn and Calvin all work hard on mounting the top of the level of the bow.

Nicole and a group of Red and Yellow Banders get ready to cut their big circular deck for the crow’s nest.

Nathan started this arc with a big interest in tugboats because of the way that they are ‘helper boats’ in a harbor. These busy little boats are the experts of a port or harbor, tugging bigger boats in and out, and directing traffic through sometimes busy waterways.¬†Which obviously goes perfectly with one of our favorite sayings over here in the Hive, “How can I help?”

Nolan drives in some screws to attach the bow to the hull of the tugboat.

Working sometimes meant squeezing into some tight places! Here, Reyahn helps attach the bow to the hull.

One morning, Emilio and Quinn headed over to the Orchard to cut a trapezoidal piece of plywood for the deck of the bow.

It was really important to the Red and Yellow Banders that they be able to go into their tugboat, and that it looked like it was above the water, like in real life. This meant that they would need to build a super strong frame to support a floor for a few people to stand on at once. And that meant they would need to use lots and lots of flat brackets. And they really really did it! Even though about 2 weeks of work consisted of just installing these brackets, they really stuck with it.

Khalilah cuts open a big cardboard box to use as the skin of the tugboat.

And now it looks like a boat!

The folks in the Red Band have spent some time learning about the international flag signal code, so Nicole was interested in building a mast of a boat to hang a flag from. And if we’re building a mast, we should probably just build the platform to stand on so that we can spot storms, other ships and even land from far away. Ya know, a crow’s nest! As we worked out our design, we knew we would need to use something in our space as an anchor, otherwise the crow’s nest would need too big of a footprint in order to be stable. One day, paging through the David Macaulay book¬†Underground, I realized that one of the big columns in our space would be perfect. They go down into the basement, making them just like the mast on a ship! This, plus a few tips from Gever (compress anchor beams to the column using ratchet straps, just like when building a treehouse!), and we were ready to turn our ideas into reality.

May and Ronin work together on assembling the wooden beams that we’ll anchor to the column in our space.

After doing some initial work on the wooden beams, we were ready to hold them up and compress them into place!

Then, we got to work on a rope ladder so that we can get up into the crow’s nest. Here, Oscar cuts a branch into 14″ sections to use as the rungs of the ladder.

After struggling with a few other knots, Sylvester decided we should try the constrictor hitch to tie together the rungs of the rope ladder. And he was right! This knot works great with the tree branch we found to use for the rungs.

These two projects are so close to being done we can almost taste it! Kiddos are already asking if the crow’s nest can be a permanent part of our landscape, and I think it may be so well built that maybe we can say yes!

Yellow Band: By Sea, Weeks 6-8

A few weeks ago, we started to talk about international shipping, the switch to containerized shipping, and the globalization of the textile industry. Yea, you read that right. All this with these 1st and 2nd graders.

Working on a map to visually display the data we collected on where everyone at Brightworks’ t-shirts came from. Read about it below!

The thing that started it all was this podcast, which focuses on the port of Oakland. It tells the story from the beginning, hearing from longshoremen and tugboat drivers, and follows the story all the way through to today, even taking the listener inside a container crane. Because, you see, shipping goods around the world used to be enormously hard, labor intensive work. Ports employed lots of people, because lots of human power was needed to load and unload cargo from the belly of ships. And so, a lot more stuff was made closer to home. Things were trucked across the country. Then, a company called Sealand used the first container. Suddenly, stuff could be loaded in boxes, and those boxes could be put on ships. Instead of each sack of coffee or pallet of cloth being painstakingly loaded, containers could quickly and relatively easily be stacked on ships. Now, all it takes is one operator in a container crane. And so, since shipping is so cheap–so cheap in fact, that the international shipping industry¬†loses money hand over fist–we started getting more and more products made overseas, where labor is cheaper. On that first day, after listening to the first episode of Containers, we took a minute to look at the tags of our t-shirts to see where they all came from. India, Indonesia, China, Guatemala, Vietnam. And off we went.

Devlin checking to see where his shirt was made. That tag can tell quite the story!

The following week, we started to look at some data about the Port of Oakland, getting ready to go on a field trip to see it all in person. We work on making graphs and charts about where the goods received at the port typically come from, and what kinds of goods are packed inside all of those containers. Then, we spent a day at Middle Harbor Shoreline Park in Oakland, right smack in the middle of the port, taking a closer look at the container cranes, and watching in awe the amount of truck traffic going in and out, in and out, constantly. So many trucks! So many containers!

We saw tugboats hurrying around the bay.

And so many trucks dropping off cargo, picking up cargo.

And one HUGE ship parked at the port, though we couldn’t tell if it was getting loaded or unloaded.

Then on Friday, it was our turn to lead morning circle. So, we posed a question to the whole school: where did the¬†shirt you’re wearing come from? And the data we collected was really compelling. The following Monday, we got to work graphing our data, making bar graphs and line plots. As we worked, we noticed that close to half of our shirts came from Asia, with Latin¬†America a distant second. We also noticed that none of our shirts came from Europe or Russia or Australia.

Solin working on her line plot of our t-shirt data.

She used t-shirts on her line plot–perfect!

Nolan’s line plot/chart came out very precise and easy to read, great job!

Then, we put our data on the map, using different sized bubbles to show the number of shirts that came from each country.

There was so much great geography woven through this exploration too!

We knew that a lot of the reason that so many shirts came from Asia, which seems very far away, is that container shipping is cheap, and so is labor, but our understanding was missing the human story. So, I went to Newsela, searching for articles about the textile industry. These articles really filled in the story of our t-shirts. First of all, chances are the cotton your t-shirt is made of was grown in the US. You won’t find that on the tag! On top of that, kids might have had a hand in making our clothes! And, women in Bangladesh actively choose to work in the textile industry, because even though it can be dangerous, it gives them freedom to earn their own money and make their own decisions.

Solin read about a change to labor laws that could lead to more children leaving school to work in the garment industry. Advocates worry about children being taken advantage, but sometimes poor families need the money that their children can earn.

That last point really stuck out to us. In our discussions of what we think about the textile industry, most Yellow Banders had a value for affordable clothes, and no discrimination for someone making the shirt here or far away. If the shipping is cheap, why not? People in other countries need good jobs, so why not make clothes? And, people need access to clothes they can afford! Reading these articles (and later listening to the Planet Money episode about two Bangladeshi sisters that work in a garment factory) gave our discussion a lot more depth and empathy. Now we could see that we could both be in favor of affordable clothes, and think that the humans that work to make our clothes deserve to earn a living wage and work in a safe environment.

Sakira and Emilio read about women in Bangladesh that work in textile factories. The women often work in hot, dangerous, grueling conditions–one woman said she tries to make 1,000 shirts everyday! But, leaving their small villages and earning their own money gives them freedom and independence. And, the money they send home significantly improves their families’ lives.

Then, I saw online that this past Monday would be the 4 year anniversary of the Rana Plaza Factory collapse in Dhaka, Bangladesh. So, I decided we should make our own t-shirts.

At the fabric store choosing fabrics!

Then, cutting out pattern pieces printed out from a free online pattern, and piecing them together like a puzzle.

In the afternoons for Beehive Choice time, we’ve been using a raglan t-shirt pattern to make shirts. Here, Dash helps Sylvester pin on his sleeves.

And Piper from the Teal Band has been coming over to help us–which has been awesome!

The Yellow Band worked on making some custom t-shirt patterns. Here, Reyahn traces Sakira to help her draw her custom pattern.

Nolan works on his custom pattern. Figuring the shape the pattern pieces need to be is pretty tricky!

And, Oscar helps Nolan cut out the fabric using his paper pattern as a guide.

And that’s the story of why we’re making clothes during the by Sea arc. In case you were wondering.

Yellow Band: by Sea, Week 5

Welcome back everyone! A short post this afternoon, just thinking about the great math work we did this week, and thought I’d share a bit.

A few weeks ago, while we were working on the constellation project, we started studying the Babylonian/Sumerian number and counting system. The ancient Babylonians did not use base 10–the system that we use, and is also the foundation of the metric measurement system. Rather, they counted in base 60. But, hit the brakes. We didn’t start there. We started by looking closely at how we use our hands to count. And we started to have some really neat discoveries!

Emilio records in his journal how he would count up to a few different numbers, some big, some small.

When we got everyone’s hands drawn on the board, we noticed some really neat things. Some people started counting on their thumbs, some on their pointers. Some held their hands palm up, others palm down. And, to count to big numbers, like 47, some people counted up by 5 and others by 10.

From there, we learned how the Babylonians counted on their hands. They did a neat thing: they used their right and left hands differently. On their right hand, they used their thumb as a pointer, and counted out each joint on each finger. This allowed them to count up to 12 on one hand. On their left hand, they kept track of the dozens that they counted on their right. In this way, they could count up to 60 on just their two hands. These first few explorations really focused on our hands, our most concrete way to count, most literal connection to the abstract concept of number.

Samira shows how she is practicing counting on her hands like a Babylonian!

Sakira helps Emilio record in his journal how to count up to a few different numbers like a Babylonian.

Then, we started to talk about base 10 and base 60. We watched a couple of videos¬†about mathematical archaeology, which pointed out to us a few fundamentals of our number system, and contrasted them to the Babylonian base 60 system. Both systems work from left to right, and as we move up an order of magnitude, we add a numeral to the left. In our system, we use a 0-9 pattern, and when we get to 9 in a place, we add one to the place value to the left in order move from 9 to 0. Each place value represents the numeral in that place multiplied by a power of 10. For example, for first place is 10^0, or 1. So, a numeral in the ‘ones place’ is equal to that numeral x 10^0. When you want to move from 9 up to the next order of magnitude, you add one to the ‘tens place,’ or 1 x 10^1 = 10, and the 9 in the ones place turns back to a 0. Well, the Babylonians basically did the same thing, except replace all the 10s with 60s. Or, as Emilio so helpfully put it for us, in base 10 your ‘silent alarm’ goes off at 10, but if you’re Babylonian, your ‘silent alarm’ goes off at 60.

All of this with 7 and 8 year olds! And they really stepped up to the plate! We learned the symbols the Babylonians used (really just 2 different symbols), then started working each morning to practice writing numbers in base 60, which got really interesting when we wanted to write big numbers.

Reyahn works on adding symbols to our ‘glossary’ of Babylonian numbers, to help folks work on translating some different numbers.

Reyahn shows how to carefully organize your symbols. The Babylonians didn’t string out their symbols, the never wrote more than three in a row. Instead, they started to stack the symbols.

Solin shares her strategy for writing a particular number in Babylonian. Solin organizes herself into the first two place values in base 60:  x 60     x 1 . This helped her see that, though she wrote the same symbol twice, one is worth 60, and other 1, so the whole number she wrote is 61.

Sakira shows how she figured out how to write 104 in Babylonian. All these numbers with only 2 symbols! You can see in this picture how Solin organizes herself into the first two place values in base 60:  x 60     x 1 . This helped her see that, though she wrote the same symbol twice, one is worth 60, and other 1, so the whole number she wrote is 61.

Once we were comfortable with the system and the symbols, we could really hit the gas. We worked mostly in just the first to places, which you can see in the picture above–which will take you all the way up to 3,599! This exploration has been so rich with number sense and operations–addition, multiplication and division–and our understanding of our own base 10 system has really gelled. By taking this step outside of our comfort zone, and essentially learning a different counting language, we noticed some really important things about our own number system that will inform the way we work with numbers forever. Woah!