Yellow Band: By Land, Weeks 5 & 6

“From each according to their ability, to each according to their need.”

Fractions, parts of a whole. Here in the Yellow Band, we are each an important part of the whole. But, we’re not each exactly the same, unlike the equal parts we’ve been dividing shapes and quantities into.

Nolan tries to add pattern blocks to his design, while keeping the proportions of blocks the same. He needs to have 1/2 of the design one color, 1/4 of a second color, and 1/4 of a third color.

Oscar, on the other hand, thought about area when figuring out how to divy up color in his design.

Last week in Class Meeting, we read the book They All Saw a Cat. It’s all about perspective–everyone sees the cat differently, yet each of their perspectives is beautiful in it’s own way. This idea has permeated a lot of our different explorations, from sharing thoughts and problem solving strategies for vitamins at Morning Meeting, to solving problems at Class Meeting, to writing based on our book club books.

Reyahn works on writing a postcard home, taking on the perspective of Elmer Elevator from his book club selection, My Father’s Dragon.

“Hey, Jenny here!” Sakira’s two postcards home so far as Jenny, from School for Cats. Her voice really shines through in these short notes, and she’s tried to incorporate both Jenny’s hardships, and excitement to be at her new school.

What’s more, our study of the Pony Express led us to an exploration of native peoples of North America. It was important to me to bring the kids’ attention to the ‘discovery myth,’ the idea that the west was discovered by the European settlers as they moved across the continent. A lot of the texts we read about both the emigrants and the Pony Express included this type of language. So, we’ve been spending some time trying to learn about the plains tribes, especially the Sioux, and using resources from the indigenous perspective whenever possible. Oh, and it also informed some of our math-art connections and vitamin work–of course!

Abir carefully folded his paper, then painted in the shapes he had created. Folding first helped us make symmetric designs composed of geometric shapes, inspired by the parfleche paintings on buffalo hides many plains tribes made.

Oh, AND, we started new projects! Nicole is working on a 3D map, and Nathan is working on a fence styled after a fence the Bees fell in love with in Mendocino.

Solin and Dash work on assembling a section of the fence. The group’s goal is to make the fence both collapsible, and walkable–like a balance beam!

Nicole helps Abir, Sylvester and Quinn trace California from the projector, the first step in making a 3D map of California.

This past week, we started giving the kiddos in the Beehive more choice in the morning activities. So, we now have Hive-wide choices 3 mornings and 3 afternoons each week. Our goal is to take cues from the kids, notice the skills and areas each child feels confident, so that we can build from there with each Red and Yellow Bander. Expect to see more pictures and captions about students from both bands, as I’ll get to work with the Red Banders a lot more moving forward!

Yellow Band: By Land, Week 1

Wait a minute, it’s only been a week?

The rock makes past the office, almost to our Thursday goal of the top of the entryway steps.

The rock makes past the office, almost to our Thursday goal of the top of the entryway steps.

This may be the Tinkering School in me talking, but I really love the way things click for kids when the scale of a question is turned way up. So, for several weeks, I’ve been thinking about the enormous things that humans move around the world. Not enormous amounts of things (yet), but rather things that are massive, heavy, take up a lot of space.

Like Stonehenge, or those big trees in Mendocino. So, we started this week pondering how people long ago moved things that are just so huge.

Our initial ideas were pretty simple, concrete. But, I chose a big heavy rock specifically because it would not work for all of us to carry it.

Our initial ideas were pretty simple, concrete. But, I chose a big heavy rock specifically because it would not work for all of us to carry it.

Not to mention that all of our hands and bodies don’t even fit around the rock!

Rock relocation, day 1.

Rock relocation, day 1.

This idea must have really gelled with the kiddos in the Beehive, because when we introduced our next building projects, many proposed that we use wheels to make something that would allow a kid to lift another kid. This led to some great explorations around simple machines (with some help from Bill Nye), not to mention enriching our ongoing discussions about how to move that darn rock.

All three of these children are integral to installing that pulley.

All three of these children are integral to installing that pulley.

Kiddos knew that wheels would be very helpful to move the rock, but one suggested that we shouldn’t use casters to build a cart because the ancient Britons that built Stonehenge would not have had wheels (that was a freeby!). Luckily, another Yellow Bander suggested that we use some type of cylinder, so we headed to the shop to see what we could find. Answer: PVC.

When Day 2 of rock relocation got underway, after a reminder to make sure to use ready calls before lifting the rock (ouch…), we managed to move the rock a grand total of about 16 inches–off the stage and onto the cork floor. It took so much teamwork, patience and sticktoitiveness, and then we were pooped.

Rock relocation, day 2. Off the stage, onto the cork floor.

Rock relocation, day 2. Off the stage, onto the cork floor.

Phew. After all of that effort, we took a break to watch a short video explaining the point of all this. Humans move enormous things by land all the time. Along the way, they encounter loads of problems to solve and the persevere so that they can get the thing to where it’s going.

Joe Vilardi of BudCo Enterprises is one of those people. You may have noticed him in that video, working on the installation of Sequence at the SFMOMA. I reached out to him weeks ago, hoping for the kiddos to have some type of interaction with this expert rigger. And he was down! Thanks Joe!

So, on Thursday, we moved the rock as far as we could–which happened to be the top of the entryway stairs.

Then, on Friday morning, we went to SFMOMA to see the Sequence in person–feel the scale of such an undertaking–and write questions for Joe.

"What's the heaviest thing you've ever moved?"

“What’s the heaviest thing you’ve ever moved?”

"How did you separate the segments of the sculpture?"

“How did you separate the segments of the sculpture?”

"How did you develop your plan for moving the sculpture?"

“How did you develop your plan for moving the sculpture?”

You can see more photos of this week in the flickr album!

Yellow Band: by Air, Week 4 & 5

There have been downs, but also ups…

The launch crew working hard outside the Lawrence Hall of Science to get the balloon ready to launch. We went through our checklists, and put our practice to good use--with a view!

The launch crew working hard outside the Lawrence Hall of Science to get the balloon ready to launch. We went through our checklists, and put our practice to good use–with a view!

Our weather balloon drifts up from our launch site at Lawrence Hall of Science.

Our weather balloon drifts up from our launch site at Lawrence Hall of Science.

The last few weeks, our skill building math and science work has built toward the launching of a weather balloon and payload, equipped with a camera set to film our trip to near space. This has been a huge undertaking, in collaboration with the Blue Band. Hence the radio silence.

First, we dropped eggs, trying to figure out how fragile an egg is, and developing strategies to record our data.

Solin records her data for egg drops at different heights. We realized that in order to discern the maximum height to drop an unprotected egg, we would need to start low.

Solin records her data for egg drops at different heights. We realized that in order to discern the maximum height to drop an unprotected egg, we would need to start low.

Then, we moved on to egg protection strategies, working up from dropping our eggs first at table height, and finally from the roof!

Sakira used some foam scraps to build a box and protect her egg. But, when the box hit the ground, it came open, the egg rolled out and cracked!

Sakira used some foam scraps to build a box and protect her egg. But, when the box hit the ground, it came open, the egg rolled out and cracked!

Rebecca and Sakira working on their egg drop packages at the Orchard. We spent a few days co-working with the Blue Band, and a lot of great cross-pollination happened. Check out those pool noodles! Rebecca devised a way to cut a slit in the pool noodle from the inside, so that she could nestle the egg inside--cozy!

Rebecca and Sakira working on their egg drop packages at the Orchard. We spent a few days co-working with the Blue Band, and a lot of great cross-pollination happened. Check out those pool noodles! Rebecca devised a way to cut the pool noodle into segments and then reassemble, so that she could nestle the egg inside–cozy!

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Devlin puts some finishing touches on his pentagonal prism, making sure to secure the egg in place with tape inside the box, his innovation for protecting the egg.

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Reyahn’s egg drop package gets dropped from the roof. And the egg made it!

All of this was to get a feel for how our package would drop to earth, and how we would protect the delicate technology inside. Our goal, after all, would be to take pictures on the earth from the stratosphere, and we didn’t want out camera to get smashed upon reentry!

This was a fun, silly and practical introduction to our project. Then, we moved on to some of the other challenges of our launch: figuring out how much our payload would weigh, calculating the volume of helium necessary to lift the payload and carry it far enough–but not too far, and planning for tracking down and retrieving the package, so that we could see the pictures we took. We decided that these three problems would make three teams. Blue would take on calculating the helium and constructing the payload, and Yellow would predict the path of the balloon, and plan for retrieval.

But first, Josh Myers (Calvin’s dad!) came in as an expert on high-altitude ballooning (HAB). Thank you SO MUCH Josh!

Josh gave us such a good rundown of what to plan for, what to expect, and the risks associated with our project. It helped the kiddos realize the scope of the project, and got them super pumped to send things into space.

Josh gave us such a good rundown of what to plan for, what to expect, and the risks associated with our project. It helped the kiddos realize the scope of the project, and got them super pumped to send things into space.

And we got to work! The Yellow Banders started small, first laying out our block, and comparing the distance across the block “as the crow flies” (aka the hypotenuse) and around, that a human would have to walk.

Sakira points out Charle's Chocolates on our map of our block.

Sakira points out Charle’s Chocolates on our map of our block.

While proving a relationship between the length of the two sides and the hypotenuse was super hard, we were able to make the connection to our flight: the “crow flies” distance, or hypotenuse, was a metaphor for the path our balloon would travel. The two sides of the block, that a human would walk, represented our driving distance to retrieve the balloon. And they would be very different.

Each morning, we worked with a map showing the predicted path of the balloon. Using the scale, Yellow Banders predicted about how far the balloon would travel. Then, they highlighted the roads we would travel on the map, and measured about how far we would travel.

Emilio works on dividing the path of the balloon into segments the same length as the scale of the map, and then counting up by 5s to approximate the distance travelled by the balloon.

Emilio works on dividing the path of the balloon into segments the same length as the scale of the map, and then counting up by 5s to approximate the distance travelled by the balloon.

Same map, different routes. Devlin thought we should take I-5, Oscar thought we should take 130 to retrieve the balloon out in the central valley.

Same map, different routes. Devlin thought we should take I-5, Oscar thought we should take 130 to retrieve the balloon out in the central valley.

And then, the day arrived. We had prepared all we could prepare; it was time for the rubber to meet the road, as my mom would say. Below are some of my favorite pictures from the day. Please check out our Flickr to see more (and video too!).

Sakira, Isaac, Reyahn and Ronan carefully (palms up!) hold the balloon for initial inflation.

Sakira, Isaac, Reyahn and Ronan carefully (palms up!) hold the balloon for initial inflation.

Reyahn and Soleil work together to hold the positive lift scale down to the ground while we inflate the balloon. We needed to inflate the balloon with a specific amount of lift, which also meant a specific volume of helium, so that the balloon would travel far enough--but not too far!

Reyahn and Soleil work together to hold the positive lift scale down to the ground while we inflate the balloon. We needed to inflate the balloon with a specific amount of lift, which also meant a specific volume of helium, so that the balloon would travel far enough–but not too far!

Solin steps up to feel the pull of the balloon up. Since helium has a lower molecular weight than the air we breathe, and is less dense, it rises in our atmosphere. It is left over from the formation of the earth, trapped inside pockets deep underground. New helium is made in the sun!

Solin steps up to feel the pull of the balloon up. Since helium has a lower molecular weight than the air we breathe, and is less dense, it rises in our atmosphere. It is left over from the formation of the earth, trapped inside pockets deep underground. New helium is made in the sun when hydrogen atoms collide!

Sadie ties off the filled balloon. This moment was a real nail-biter, but you would have thought so from Sadie's calm, steady hand, twisting and wrapping one rubber band after another.

Sadie ties off the filled balloon. This moment was a real nail-biter, but you wouldn’t have thought so from Sadie’s calm, steady hand, twisting and wrapping one rubber band after another.

Oscar and Tamasen gazed the travel of the balloon, up and away, for as long as they could. It drifted south, and faded to a pale white dot as it rose.

Oscar and Tamasen gazed the travel of the balloon, up and away, for as long as they could. It drifted south, and faded to a pale white dot as it rose.

Several brave souls jumped into cars to chase down the balloon--what an adventure! We recovered the balloon, the payload and all of the footage. Come check it out at our arc presentation next Thursday!

Several brave souls jumped into cars to chase down the balloon–what an adventure! We recovered the balloon, the payload and all of the footage. Come check it out at our arc presentation next Thursday!

Yellow + Green = Chartreuse

…and Yellow Band + Green Band = Chartreuse Band

A lot of change has taken place in the Yellow and Green bands over the last couple of weeks, and we are so excited to share that we have combined to become Super Band Chartreuse. Since the beginning of the year the Green and Yellow Bands have been sister bands.  We have gone on all our field trips together, worked on our math provocations together and done our projects together. After all, our 16 nine and ten year olds make up a quarter of the entire school.

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There have been so many benefits to working together.  As co-teachers we’ve been able to play off both of our individual strengths, pool our resources, create unique lessons, diversify the options available to students and offer more one on one instructional moments. Now each member of the Chartreuse Band has two collaborators supporting them through their journey this year.

We knew that this would be a big change for all the students and a difficult one for some, so we wanted to make sure they felt as involved as possible with decisions being made. We took our need to reconfigure our band spaces to as an opportunity to involve their ideas and integrate a design thinking project. We brainstormed new layouts, everything from using the Yellow Band space as a group meeting space and the Green Band space as personal desk space, to building a bridge from the Yellow Band space to the roof of the office. We took measurements of all our considered spaces and found their area to gather additional data. Knowing that everyone would have their own opinion on what we should do in the end, we chose to take this opportunity to work on our persuasive writing skills. This gave them a chance to share their ideas in a carefully thought out way. It was so wonderful to hear all their ideas and reasons, and most of all to hear them empathize with others whose spaces might be lost in the process. We’ve taken a vote and the ballots will be counted Monday. Hopefully we’ll find some time in this last week before winter break, interspersed among our declaration writing, to create the Chartreuse Band Space(s).20151203_095952

On top of all the practical work of creating a “new” band space, we have also been doing a lot of work around social dynamics. We have been reading a number of Trudy Ludwig’s books, including My Secret Bully, Sorry!, and Trouble Talk. We are learning to empathize with others, appreciate one another for small things we may have not noticed until now, and make thoughtful and honest apologies. We are hopeful that the work we are doing will flow out through the rest of the Brightworks community.

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And just in case you find the word chartreuse a bit of a challenge to spell, just remember it is simply chart+reuse.

Seeds, Seedfolks, Seed Olympics!

This post is a collaborative writing project by the entire Yellow Band. Enjoy!

We began our week by figuring out how many acres of farmland we would need to feed San Francisco’s population of roughly 840,000 people. We found that it would take the equivalent of close to 43 San Francisco’s in acreage, if one farm of about 230 acres feeds on average 150 people. That’s a lot of land! Like our hanging gutter planter, one solution is to farm vertically, minimizing its footprint.

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We have been continuing to observe out self-watering planters. Last Friday, Quinn’s pinto bean plant had not yet sprouted and by Monday morning it had reached about 7 inches tall. In comparison, Huxley’s lentil plant which had already sprouted last week only grew about 3 inches over the weekend. Patrick’s bean plant that was left to grow on the ledge under the gutter planter has grow up and around the gutter to reach the sunlight. Justin’s plant still has not sprouted. He believes that his soil was too wet when he planted his seed.

Self watering planters

Self watering planters

Self watering planters

Self watering planters

Self watering planters

On Monday afternoon, we walked to the All in Common Community Garden with the Green Band. We continued to read our book Seedfolks. Change continued to be a theme in the chapters we read. We volunteered at the garden and met the garden’s resident cat. We swept and raked leaves to use as fertilizer for some potatoes we helped plant. We learned that the garden had once been a vacant lot just like the garden in Seedfolks.

All in Common Community Garden

All in Common Community Garden

On Tuesday we began our Seed Dispersal Olympics with the Green Band. Our first event was to build a machine that could be activated in the wild that could fling or explode seeds. To help us gather ideas we watched a short video about plants that use explosions to spread their seeds. We all created different designs including slingshots, catapults, and balloons fill of vinegar and baking soda. We will be testing all the designs on Friday.

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Wednesday morning we continued our Seed Dispersal Olympics by creating ways to disperse seeds in water. We looked for materials that would float and hold air. Some included corks, balloons, and tin foil. 

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In the afternoon, we went to Starbucks to write our NaNoWriMo stories. We wanted to try working in a different environment than our band space. Being able to buy our own treats made some of us feel a bit more at home. Justin, Quinn, and Patrick shared their stories with one another giving each other the chance to add a sentence to each story.

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On Thursday morning we began our wind powered Seed Dispersal Olympics. Lucy looked for fluff to add to a seed to help it fly. Nora and Quinn worked to create a hang glider balloon, while Patrick frayed paracord, and Justin worked on a straw and paper hang glider (which he thinks would work better as a boat.) Huxley and his group used tracing paper to make a lightweight bowl to hopefully trap the air as it travelled. After a few trials, Huxley found that his bowl waited to be dropped the opposite way than he had originally expected.

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Friday morning brought the “competition” portion of our Seed Dispersal Olympics. We saw everything from catapults to balloon rafts to fluff to water balloon popping devices. While each machine dispersed their seeds in their own unique ways, all machines showed incredible thought regarding the method of dispersal. After the competition, each band member received a medal for their individual contributions to the Seed Dispersal Olympics.

Seed Dispersal Olympics Medal Ceremony

Seed Dispersal Olympics Medal Ceremony

The Yellow Band Continues to Explore Seeds

Oat math, Seedfolks, hanging gutter planters, and NaNoWriMo.

The Yellow Band has been busy exploring seeds.

We began our days exploring the math concepts of estimation, averages, and time by way of Gever’s oat seed. The task: find out how many oat seeds need to be peeled for one cup of oats and how long will it take. Estimates on how many oat seeds make up one cup ranged anywhere from 3,622 to 5,500. Recognizing that it would take them many hours to count that amount of seeds, they decided upon each counting how many they had in a tablespoon, taking an average of each band member’s quantity, and multiplying that by the 16 tablespoons it takes to make up a cup. Strategies for counting possibly hundreds of seeds popped up quickly. Soon enough everyone was grouping their seeds in groups of either fives or tens. After counting and taking an average, we found that a cup would have approximately 3,680 oat seeds in it. It’s pretty amazing to think that one of the estimates was only 58 seeds away!

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Oat math

After our work around the quantities of seeds we began to look at it in terms of time required to peel the oat seeds. Estimates to peel one cup of oats ranged from one and a half hours to five hours. We brainstormed strategies for figuring this out without having to actually peel 3,680 oats. We also realized that the rate at which we could peel the oats might fluctuate over time due to improving our skills (faster) or tiredness (slower). We decided to time our peeling for two different quantities: 10 oats and 20 oats. We found that when we peeled 20 oats we did improve our time ever so slightly, so we decided to take the average of our total time for both quantities. We quickly found that we were way off with our estimates. According to our work, it would take around 15 hours 38 minutes and 24 seconds to peel all those oats. More than three times our longest estimated time!

Oat math

One afternoon we took a walk over to the Potrero Hill Community Garden with the Green Band. After exploring the gardens for a bit, we gathered together to begin reading the book Seedfolks. Each chapter covers a story about each of the characters contributing to a community garden in Cleveland. We talked about the themes of change and community that wove throughout the stories.  We found ourselves embodying those themes when we helped the garden coordinator with some clean up and by bringing in the compost bins. She kindly thanked us by sharing some of her lemon verbena that we dried and made tea with the following morning.

Potrero Hill Community Garden

Potrero Hill Community Garden

Potrero Hill Community Garden

Early seed arc

Potrero Hill Community Garden

Wanting to take a closer look at the process of germination, we created a seed jar. We chose a variety of seeds, including pumpkin, forget-me-not, beet, California poppy, carrot, squash, and cornflower. We talked about what might sprout first, shoots or roots, the majority said shoots, and took guesses as to which seed might germinate first. After three days our first seed germinated. It was the cornflower and it was the roots that sprouted first. The poppy seeds weren’t far behind in germinating and by the end of the week, the only seeds that showed no sign of germination were those of the forget-me-nots. The roots of a number of them had also buried their way into the paper towel they were growing on.

Seed jar

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Seed jar germination

Seed jar germination

Seed jar germination

Looking to grow more plants in our band space, we decided to take advantage of our vertical space and created a hanging window planter out of rain gutters. We had to take measurements of the window, draw out our plans, cut down our gutters, plan our plantings, find a way to hang it, drill holes for drainage, fill them with soil, and plant our seeds. Hopefully in a few weeks we will have everything from lettuce to poppies growing in our space.

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Window gutter planter

Window gutter planter

Yellow Band: Our Exploration into Seed is Growing and So Are Our NaNoWriMo Novels

It’s amazing to think that we have completed our first arc, are already two weeks into our exploration of Seed, and have launched into NaNoWriMo.

We began the arc by exploring the idea of seed and plant as food. The grocery store and the farmer’s market both provided perfect locations for scavenger hunts. At the grocery store they worked to find seeds you drink, seeds that are baked into something, seeds you can spread, seeds with caffeine, seeds in a can, and many more ways to consume or use seeds. The farmer’s market gave them a place to search out seeds, roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and fruit of all kinds. Not only did we search out these plants parts, but we bought a representative of each (seeds-corn, roots-carrot, stem-celery, leaves-lettuce, flowers-squash blossoms, fruit-tomatoes), split up into groups to study and dissect them, shared our learning with each other, and then created and enjoyed a delicious salad out of them.

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In the first week we also took a closer look at seeds through the dissection of corn kernels and peas. We observed the differences between the two types of seeds: monocots (one cotyledon – corn) and dicots (two cotyledons – peas). We studied and researched their various parts, learning about their functions.

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Week two took us into the launch of NaNoWriMo, Slide Ranch, and self-watering planters. The creative juices have been flowing and the Yellow Band has been begging to stay in from park to continue working on their novels everyday. There are talking berries, an ant named Snail and a snail named Ant, kings and princesses, and a bunch of newts all named George. They are constantly supporting each other, helping one another brainstorm plot twists and character names. Sneaking a peak at their stories whenever I can is the highlight of my day.

Yellow band NaNoWriMo launch day!

Yellow band NaNoWriMo launch day!

Yellow band NaNoWriMo launch day!

Yellow band NaNoWriMo launch day!

Yellow band NaNoWriMo launch day!

Yellow band NaNoWriMo launch day!

Our trip to Slide Ranch took us to a working farm where we milked a goat, saw a whale in the distance, fed chickens and learned about their egg laying, played in the “fennel forest” and ate fennel “gum,” and relaxed in the vegetable garden while listening to the book A Seed is Sleepy.

Slide Ranch

Slide Ranch

Slide Ranch

Slide Ranch

Slide Ranch

Slide Ranch

Slide Ranch

Slide Ranch

As a way to create an observation nursery in our band space, we built self-watering planters out of recycled plastic food containers. The planters were created by drilling holes in the bottom of a smaller container and threading yarn or string through them. The smaller container was then slowly filled with soil, as to make sure the strings or yarn were spread throughout, and then seeds were planted. The larger bottom container was filled with water before placing the smaller container and its lower dangling strings or yarn into it. The goal is for the water to travel up the yarn or string and seep out into the soil, slowly self-watering the plant. We will continue to observe and track the growth of our plants throughout the arc.

Creating self-watering planters

Creating self-watering planters

Creating self-watering planters

Creating self-watering planters

Creating self-watering planters

Creating self-watering planters

Yellow Band’s First Three Days

Build new friendships. Strengthen old ones. Become a team.

It was amazing in just the first three days of school to watch the Yellow Band, in which 50% of us are new to Brightworks, come together so naturally.

We've enjoyed day 1! #Yellowband #sfbrightworks

Beginning on day one, our focus of the week was getting to know one another and how we will work together and interact with our environment. We learned about each other’s hopes and dreams, strengths and challenges, and senses of humor. We worked together to create our band agreements: take care of other’s feelings, let everyone learn, respect our environment, have safe bodies, and respect other’s belongings. We talked about how our agreements reach far beyond the walls of our band space, into the rest of the school and out of its doors. 

On top of all of our bonding, it is incredible how much we did in three days. We drew portraits of one another. We worked on asking and offering help in the shop. We brainstormed ideas of how to see rocks from multiple angles. We sorted rocks. We looked for rocks around the neighborhood.We visited the library. We had our first community lunch. We closed out each day with a relaxing read aloud. We are ready and excited to leap, full of questions, forward into the Rock Arc.  

Hoping and dreaming. #Yellowband #sfbrightworks
Day 1. #Yellowband #sfbrightworksJustin's creative portraits of the #Yellowband #sfbrightworks
Rock brainstorm. #rock #Yellowband #sfbrightworksRock sort #rock #Yellowband #sfbrightworks
Today we sorted rocks and categorized them. We tried to figure out how they were made. (Huxley) #rocks #Yellowband #sfbrightworksThe #Yellowband is going graphic. #sfbrightworks #reading